Tag Archives for " social media "

3 Reasons You Should Be Using Social Media for Recruiting

With all of the online options available to job seekers today, human resources departments have to be strategic when posting available positions. Recruiters often think to look for candidates on employment sites, their own company websites and even local community job boards, and up to 70% of recruiters are now utilizing social media. So why should you use social media for recruiting? Social media offers three clear benefits that  job posting websites do not.

1. Social Media for Recruiting Is Cost-Effective

Unlike many job posting sites, the cost for social media can be very minimal. Campaigns can be set up per impression or per click (also known as Pay-Per-Click advertising). Facebook and LinkedIn offer date-bound options so you can end the campaign at a particular day and time. Both platforms also allow advertisers to set a total budget the platforms algorithms distribute the campaign funds over the lifetime of the campaign. This works well if you have a small team that cannot monitor the campaign every day.

Social Media for recruiting

2. Social Media for Recruiting Allows You To Target Your Audience

Social media also offers the benefit of creating specific, targeted audiences. Facebook and LinkedIn both allow advertisers to create custom audiences based on a wide variety of demographics, from identifying people near your chosen location to current job titles, education, and salary. This provides the opportunity for recruiters to zero in on the most qualified talent for the position. A word of caution here, though: the ultra-specific audience targeting available through these social media sites may limit the number and type of candidates you see. Remember to broaden your scope as needed to ensure you consider a well-rounded applicant pool.

3. Social Media for Recruiting Gives You The Power To Track Conversions

The final reason social media should be used as part of every human resources recruitment strategy  is the ability to easily track conversions and see measurable results. Knowing how well your advertising worked is important to help justify the dollars that are spent on recruitment efforts. On social media, you can view your campaign’s performance and evaluate how many people have seen your ad, interacted with your ad, and even clicked over to the job description or application page. There are a variety of parameters you can choose from for tracking conversions. Your definition of “conversion” can be set as a website click through, interacting with your ad, or even just as simply as how many people saw the ad. So, your conversion can be customized based on how your department wants to analyze results and define success.

Are your leaders utilizing social media as well? Social media can be a powerful internal tool, that improves engagement and brings outstanding candidates to your door. Make sure your leaders are trained in the soft skills and people skills that create an environment where employees thrive and unions aren’t necessary.

Remember too that your recruitment efforts can be influenced by your overall employer brand online. When you take the time to produce video about what it’s like to work for your company, post regularly about your positive employee relations, or dig in to your LinkedIn Company and LinkedIn Career pages, it speaks volumes about the pride people feel in working there. When you’re ready to launch your social media recruiting strategy, be sure to consider all the factors, including where your ideal client spends time on line, and which platforms appeal to the ideal candidate for your available positions.

Social media for recruiting

social media employees

Why Great Social Media Video is Gold for Your Employees

Social media is no longer optional if you want to engage your employees and build your employer brand. Mobile devices are a primary source of information and communication for most Americans, and platforms like Facebook and Twitter are central to the mobile lifestyle. In short, if you aren’t on social media and you don’t have great social media video, your message isn’t being heard – and that inhibits your ability to attract top talent and retain your most highly-qualified workers.

Adding Social Media Video to Your Media Mix

While it is possible to connect with employees through text-based posts and long-form content, research shows that the most effective way to capture the attention of your audience is through images. When those images are delivered in the form of short, creative videos, you can count on a positive response. One study demonstrated that four times as many consumers would prefer to watch a video about a product than to read about it – and that preference extends to receiving all sorts of information, including your employer branding messages.

RELATED: Why Your Employer Brand Matters

Perhaps the most important reason to communicate through social media video is the retention factor. Your employees are 65 percent more likely to remember your content after three days when it is presented in a visual format versus a text-based format. That means more time to consider your message and share it with colleagues, extending your reach dramatically.

Consider the benefits of a strong social media presence. Creative, engaging employer branding encourages job-seekers to become applicants, and it keeps current staff members connected with the company. Employers have successfully leveraged social media video to communicate with current and prospective employees about benefits, company culture, and social responsibility. Some even use this forum to encourage strong connections between management and the workforce, effectively discouraging unions from their attempts to stir discontent.

Stories, Tweets, and Channels – Differentiating Your Social Media Strategy Across Platforms

While it is possible to use the same social media video content across multiple platforms, your social media campaigns should include slightly different strategies for each of the popular sites. Differentiate your content based on the culture promoted by individual channels. These are the basics for today’s top social media platforms:

  • Facebook – This is the first place most of your employees will look for you, so make sure your page is entertaining. This is your opportunity to get a little more casual, sharing images and videos you want to go viral.
  • Social Media Leaders – Microsoft knows how to make the most of Facebook, with two major pages. Check out Microsoft Life and Women of Microsoft.
  • LinkedIn – This site is primarily geared towards job seekers, so it is an important place to build your employer brand. The tone is more formal on LinkedIn than on other social media platforms.
  • Social Media LeadersGeneral Mills leverages LinkedIn’s video capabilities to connect with job seekers.
  • YouTube – It’s all about video on YouTube. Using text to share your message simply isn’t an option. This is a great opportunity to start up a channel and create video content that illustrates a-day-in-the-life at your company. Use this platform to house your video, then connect to it through your other social media pages.
  • Social Media LeadersPenn National Gaming’s YouTube Channel is a great example of high-quality video branding.
  • Twitter – Micro-blogging means you have to make your point quickly if you choose a written format. Fortunately, you don’t have to limit the number of characters in your videos. Use this platform to link followers to your content through your tweets.
  • Social Media Leaders – Zappos uses a dedicated Inside Zappos Twitter Page to connect with current and prospective employees.

Getting started on social media doesn’t have to be complicated. Start with Facebook, then expand to other popular platforms. For more information on connecting with your employees through innovative, engaging social media videos, visit Projections, Inc.

The Social Side of Employee Communication

Employee engagement is a persistent problem for organizations around the world for many reasons. They include increasing use of remote workers, technology that makes interpersonal communication less personal, generational differences in work expectations and communication styles, the inability to clearly separate work and personal lives, poor leadership skills and employees feeling undervalued.

The Social Mindset Is a Bond

Engagement exists when empowered employees feel connected to their work and the organization, but each person in your organization experiences engagement in a different way. For this reason, developing high engagement levels begins with developing an organizational “social mindset” in which a sense of community is created. Unions have mastered this concept, making their members feel like they’re in an exclusive club with leaders who really listen, and will champion their causes and go to bat for them when issues arise. Unions regularly communicate with their members, using social media tools and personal meetings, to keep the connection strong and inspire feelings of empowerment. The union social mindset is a bond that unites everyone around a common cause.

Social factors are important to all employees but especially to millennials. They’re always connected via social media, but social media by itself isn’t guaranteed to engage people or promote optimal communication. Too many employers miss the link between a social mindset and engagement. Social media is an engagement tool, but if your organization doesn’t develop a social mindset, your employees won’t utilize the social tools to their greatest advantage. Your employees’ behaviors are indicative of a lack of social mindset. For example, low utilization of an enterprise-wide social media system or lack of response to a manager’s feedback on a project in progress or failure to participate on coworker teams, are a few indications that your employees don’t view themselves as important contributors to a cohesive team of workers.

An organization with a social mindset focuses on its people and is key to creating a culture of inclusion in which people thrive. Creating an organization with a social mindset requires giving people the right tools, but the tools must empower people to learn what they need and want to learn to achieve the highest performance level and to learn when they want to learn. It must be a collaborative learning journey in which people learn from each other, and have access to on-demand learning and access to internal and external communities that enable continuous learning. A social mindset means employees utilize all online and offline social systems to autonomously manage their jobs with a clear understanding of how their work contributes to organizational goals. They see themselves as proactive team members doing important work.

Self-Empowerment

Engagement actually emanates from the ability of employees to self-empower. Your organization is unique from all others. It’s why you’ve achieved competitive success. The uniqueness drives the need for the development of an internal communication system that specifically resonates with your employees. The communication system consists of tools that are available to the entire workforce; consistent, tailored messaging; regular management feedback; and leaders with effective communication skills. Engaging your workforce in a meaningful way also requires providing content that adds value to their work and is easily understood.

Millennials prefer information delivered quickly and with visual aids, and user-friendly communication platforms that include video, web, and eLearning communication tools. Of course, mobile platforms are a necessity in the eyes of your younger employees. This creates the seamless communication system that accommodates the ‘where and when’ learning and communication needs. Engaging employees requires you to encourage all people to participate in the business, including remote workers, and to provide opportunities for improving processes. Meetings can encourage people to ask questions rather than expecting people to passively learn the material. Technology-based training programs are interactive. Leader feedback encourages stretch thinking. This is how you develop a social learning organization.

Self-Motivated and Committed Employees

Various researchers have determined that employee engagement recognizes an employee’s psychological state, behaviors, and linkages between engagement and employee satisfaction. Satisfaction is not enough though. Engaged employees are committed to the organization’s mission, self-motivated and passionate about their work. Your organization’s communication system is an essential element in the engagement process, but only if it stimulates constructive conversations and positive behaviors.

Southwest Airlines is an example of a company that has created a social mindset. Employees are encouraged to collaborate, participate in decision-making and explore work activities outside their regular jobs. Employees across the organization were encouraged to share new ideas for uniforms, and one of the flight attendants chosen to participate on a final design committee called it an “unforgettable experience.” Southwest Airlines considers social media as a means for relationship building with and between employees and customers because it gives the company the ability to connect people across teams and cultures.

Airbnb creates an employee experience which considers physical, emotional, aspirational, intellectual and virtual (collaborative technologies) aspects. The collaborative technologies are used to communicate the company culture and hold an online live-streamed weekly meeting, and employees are encouraged to use WhatsApp to share learning, photos, and insights. This enables the company to create a social mindset by opening communication up to all employees around the world.

An Organizing Model for Employers

Previously a labor organizer, author Jane McAlevey shared her experiences and perspectives on union organizing in “Raising Expectations (and Raising Hell)” and proposed a union-building operational model in “No Shortcuts: Organizing for Power in the New Gilded Age.” She points out that mobilizing may bring large numbers of people into the battle for employee rights but these are people already committed. To build a strong union, its leaders must expand its base to include ordinary people who were never involved in organizing. They do this by helping ordinary people understand they hold the power and can achieve desired outcomes.

Her basic operating model has several major elements that include: deep organizing in which indifferent people are attracted; full-worker organizing in which all working people are made to understand they are members of a community and have untapped potential; building unity across classes of people; developing organic leaders who create a social force capable of exercising power; and tracking every worker’s participation in the workplace and the community to better engage them in the union learning and development processes.

Creating the Social Context

McAlevey’s model is an engagement model. As an employer, you must understand an engaging communication system in your organization makes it possible for all employees to participate, exercise their power to contribute to organizational success and create a social force. The social mindset encourages people to fully participate in the communication process by providing context.

It’s not a passive system. It proactively embraces the disengaged, drawing them into the community of the already engaged. The communication skills of your leaders are crucial to the development of a social mindset. You want your employees to join your organizational efforts to remain innovative, competitive and successful, instead of joining a union. It’s the path to union proofing your business.

11 Examples of How Great Social Media Sets Employers Apart

Forging meaningful connections via social media is a goal of most people. It’s not just individuals though; about 50 percent of large companies and 75 percent of small businesses use social media.

Here are a few examples of how companies excel in using social media:

  1. Best Buy’s Blue Shirt Nation (BSN): This is a community of Best Buy employees who share knowledge, best practices and ideas, regardless of their positions and even ages. Best Buy has successfully integrated this internal network with its employees’ lives and have used it to empower employees and engage them meaningfully.
  2. Zappos: Two-thirds of employees of this online shoe and clothing shop have a social media presence, where they are encouraged to freely connect online with customers. Besides that, the company fosters a culture that helps employees thrive and be happy. You can be sure that no employee of such a company would consider union organizing.
  3. Indium Corporation of America: This solder manufacturer has ten blogs and 15 bloggers. The company has been able to cultivate relationships that enhance not just customer satisfaction and brand loyalty but also employee satisfaction.
  4. Latham & Watkins LLP: The private social network of this large law firm is useful from recruitment to retirement as it contains relevant official and personal content.
  5. Starbucks: Although this popular coffeehouse chain has a social media team, it encourages its employees to share updates about the brand on their own social media accounts. Besides, it has an online community, MyStarbucksIdea, where customers and employees can suggest ideas to improve the Starbucks experience and see it happen. Such employers suck the wind out of the union-organizing sail!
  6. Giantnerd: This company sells equipment for outdoor activities like hiking, biking and snowboarding. They created a social network within their website. You can join it with just one click upon which you will receive a five-percent discount. If you click the Like button on the site or join its Facebook community, you get exclusive deals. Since adding the Like button, Giantnerd’s average order has increased by 50 percent.
  7. San Chez Bistro: This tapas bistro and restaurant uses social media to be in sync with its customers. You can use Twitter to reserve a seat, which is known as “tweet-ahead seating.” Once you tweet, the online hostess tweets back to confirm. They also use their Foursquare page to offer incentives to patrons.
  8. Hootsuite: This popular social media dashboard regularly posts its employees’ photos on Instagram. It tags the employee in the description. Acknowledging and applauding employees improve employee morale and can be a positive union-avoidance method.
  9. Marsh Inc.: When this global risk management and insurance broker wanted to teach finance to a group of employees, it approached its finance experts, who created a 27-part blog series that included both written content and videos taken using phones.
  10. Deloitte: The multinational professional services firm has an internal social network, D Street. Each employee gets a personal landing page at D Street, complete with a photo gallery, an “about me” section and a blog. D Street also has online communities where employees can interact with each other. You can be sure they don’t discuss union card signing there!
  11. Southwest Airlines: This major US airline gets its staff to share stories on its blog, Nuts About Southwest, and post things about the firm on social media. Its social media actions were much appreciated in July 2016, when a technical outage brought the company website and email system down and Southwest’s social media team worked nonstop to respond to frantic queries.

Companies use social media largely to increase brand awareness or as marketing and sales tools. However, it can also be an excellent way to engage your workers meaningfully.

One Word That Summarizes the Future of Employee Communication

Today’s workforce is the most diverse it’s ever been, with employees at large and small companies coming from many different backgrounds and spanning multiple generations. It’s an exciting time, but also one that means employers are tasked with finding new and more efficient ways to connect and communicate with employees.

One Word

The one word that summarizes the future of employee communication is customization. Employers need to customize material, training programs and overall communication to specific audiences to make sure their business runs as smoothly as possible. Here are some examples of how customization can help out in the workplace.

Custom-Crafted Employee Video

Far from the cheesy training videos from the past, today’s custom video creations are fun, inspiring, and not just consistent, but consistently effective. Consider custom video for your message, particularly if you have employees who speak a variety of languages and you need them all to get the same information.  Additionally, with the ability to place your video message online, you can reach additional audiences as needed, including employees’ families. This is a great plan if you’re making changes to your benefits plan or if the company is relocating or announcing other big changes. Creating a positive feeling around change can go a long way toward acceptance of that change.

Custom Employee-focused Websites

Creating a powerful and effective employee website can be a challenge, and maintaining it is another proposition altogether. But customization is key – it’s no longer enough to just piggy-back off third party resources – as an employer of choice, your company has to provide customized resources that connect with employees and the all-important secondary audience at home. Creating password-protected sites that protect your company and your employees from outside interference is a great way to inspire trust and confidence in the resources you’re providing online. Including information on the state of your business, your union-free philosophy, Human Resources, and employee benefits is an important part of keeping a happy and healthy workforce. Custom-created websites allow you to keep the content fresh, interesting and relevant, making the information meaningful to employees.

Custom-crafted eLearning Programs

Not nearly as expensive today as they once were, custom-crafted interactive eLearning programs can help you create a sense of community among your employees, as your training and information instantly becomes consistent and spot-on with content employees and managers need. Interactive eLearning can engage your employees, bolster communication and build solid communication across geography, time zones, varying shifts, different jobs – everyone engages in the same way and learns the material you need them to know. Compliance tracking can provide you with the knowledge you need to make sure your eLearning is doing its job.

Custom Messaging through Social Media

Creating social media groups that let employees share information with each other and managers in a more relaxed and comfortable way can be another great method of improving employee relations. The purpose of social media is to build communities and facilitate interaction. (Check out our previous post on this topic, with some great insight, here!) You can use private Facebook groups to share news about your company and start new conversations or to recognize employees for their accomplishments, and you can use Twitter to communicate fast, short updates to your employees.

Employee communication is more important now than ever. Learn how to customize your interactions with employees to ensure they are happy and feel valued by your company.