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3 Reasons You Should Be Using Social Media for Recruiting

With all of the online options available to job seekers today, human resources departments have to be strategic when posting available positions. Recruiters often think to look for candidates on employment sites, their own company websites and even local community job boards, and up to 70% of recruiters are now utilizing social media. So why should you use social media for recruiting? Social media offers three clear benefits that  job posting websites do not.

1. Social Media for Recruiting Is Cost-Effective

Unlike many job posting sites, the cost for social media can be very minimal. Campaigns can be set up per impression or per click (also known as Pay-Per-Click advertising). Facebook and LinkedIn offer date-bound options so you can end the campaign at a particular day and time. Both platforms also allow advertisers to set a total budget the platforms algorithms distribute the campaign funds over the lifetime of the campaign. This works well if you have a small team that cannot monitor the campaign every day.

Social Media for recruiting

2. Social Media for Recruiting Allows You To Target Your Audience

Social media also offers the benefit of creating specific, targeted audiences. Facebook and LinkedIn both allow advertisers to create custom audiences based on a wide variety of demographics, from identifying people near your chosen location to current job titles, education, and salary. This provides the opportunity for recruiters to zero in on the most qualified talent for the position. A word of caution here, though: the ultra-specific audience targeting available through these social media sites may limit the number and type of candidates you see. Remember to broaden your scope as needed to ensure you consider a well-rounded applicant pool.

3. Social Media for Recruiting Gives You The Power To Track Conversions

The final reason social media should be used as part of every human resources recruitment strategy  is the ability to easily track conversions and see measurable results. Knowing how well your advertising worked is important to help justify the dollars that are spent on recruitment efforts. On social media, you can view your campaign’s performance and evaluate how many people have seen your ad, interacted with your ad, and even clicked over to the job description or application page. There are a variety of parameters you can choose from for tracking conversions. Your definition of “conversion” can be set as a website click through, interacting with your ad, or even just as simply as how many people saw the ad. So, your conversion can be customized based on how your department wants to analyze results and define success.

Are your leaders utilizing social media as well? Social media can be a powerful internal tool, that improves engagement and brings outstanding candidates to your door. Make sure your leaders are trained in the soft skills and people skills that create an environment where employees thrive and unions aren’t necessary.

Remember too that your recruitment efforts can be influenced by your overall employer brand online. When you take the time to produce video about what it’s like to work for your company, post regularly about your positive employee relations, or dig in to your LinkedIn Company and LinkedIn Career pages, it speaks volumes about the pride people feel in working there. When you’re ready to launch your social media recruiting strategy, be sure to consider all the factors, including where your ideal client spends time on line, and which platforms appeal to the ideal candidate for your available positions.

Social media for recruiting

Tweaking Your Employer Brand for Better Recruiting

Why are so many skilled professionals clamoring to land a job with companies like Facebook and Google? While yes, these companies appear stable and lucrative, there is something much bigger fueling interest: their employer brands. The perks, the opportunities, the flexibility and the social environment – these are the factors job seekers want to hear about. So if your company isn’t attracting quite the right candidates or if your retention rates are lower than you’d prefer, consider tweaking your employer brand.

Where Are You Taking Them?

No false advertising here. Just start providing an honest look at your company’s work environment. That’s why it’s key to focus on the Employee Engagement Journey and help prospective employees understand what it means to become a vital part of your team.

While each job and each person is on a unique path, clearly defining what your employer brand promises can go a long way toward establishing trust. You might publish pictures from an office party or a sneak peek at employees collaborating on a new product. Just make sure the kind of content you publish aligns with how your company presents its brand identity and values.

Consider recruiting current employees to participate in communicating your employer brand. While you can talk about how wonderful the company is all day long, seeing social media posts or reading blogs from employees themselves often creates a stronger image of work culture.

An Employer of Choice

There are a few key factors that will propel your brand from anonymity to popularity. As these factors are reiterated and established over time, candidates will come to trust your brand.

Being an “employer of choice” requires that you think of “compensation” as more than just wages paid. For a company with a strong employer brand and reputation, compensation includes the full range of benefits an employees enjoy. Broaden that scope to include things that move team members along in their journey with the company, including skill-building workshops, work-from-home opportunities and bonding and networking internally with co-workers. Be sure to present the full range of compensation (your employer brand) to candidates, as few will be fully aware.

Another thing to remember is to keep your compensation package open and adaptable. As you communicate more with employees, you may find that certain benefits need to be tweaked, added, or removed to be sure the brand is supporting their journey.

Communicate Your Employer Brand

One of the most powerful forces that will make you an employer of choice is word of mouth. Your current employees are the best spokespersons for your brand – both during and after their time with you. Thus it is critical to continuously check in on employee engagement. Keep the lines of communication open so when a change needs to happen, employees have no problem talking to you about it.

Consider creating a “pre-hire orientation” message that will communicate all that is expected of employees. This way, your recruiting efforts have a better chance of resonating with the right candidates. If an applicant sees something they don’t like in the pre-hire orientation process, they (and you) know your company isn’t a fit for them.

Build a network of trust both within and outside of your company, and your brand reputation will shine through everything else. As Lindsay Nahmiache, co-founder of Jive PR eloquently phrased it in Forbes, “Building a network is a gradual process that takes months and sometimes years to pay off . It consists of continually providing support and value in two-way relationships.”

Recruitment Pros: There’s a 33% Chance Your HR Team Thinks You’re Failing

Recruiting New EmployeesIf you’ve ever felt your talent is suffering because of your recruiting and onboarding processes, you are far from alone. A recent study revealed that 33 percent of HR teams believe their organization is “not competitive in the battle for talent” because of recruitment failures.

The U.S. unemployment rate is hovering at low levels, recently hitting its lowest level since 2007. If your company is worried about the national talent shortage, know that avoiding some of the most common HR mistakes could yield a competitive edge.

1. The Wrong Recruitment Tech

Seventy-three percent of HR leaders feel they are not using recruitment technology appropriately. If your organization still scans resumes manually and uses paper checklists, you may have massive potential to become more efficient. From technology-assisted resume matching to automated candidate scheduling, smarter technology can significantly free up time for HR to focus on strategy.

Using the right recruitment technology is also one way to help your organization discover new talent pipelines, from social media candidate sourcing to benchmarking your organization’s openings against talent in your area.

RELATED: How Virtual Reality Will Change Human Resources

2. No Screening for Cultural Fit

Cultural fit is critical for successful employee performance at organizations of any size. Airbnb is one firm who attributes some of their success to hiring employees based on values. Experts recommend using personality assessments and “off-the-wall” interview questions to learn more about who your candidates are as people before making a job offer.

3. Not Setting Clear Expectations With Potential Recruits

Recruitment should be a mutual selection process. Onboarding, or a formal approach to acclimating new hires to your organization, can help your new employees succeed. However, onboarding is also an important way for potential hires to assess fit and determine whether they will thrive in your culture. Some highly successful companies use a “pre-hire orientation” video to acclimate their candidates to culture, values and expectations. Using standardized content, like a video, can introduce massive consistency in global or distributed organizations

Recruitment has never been an easy undertaking, and the nationwide talent shortage has only made it more challenging. Fortunately, there are a variety of technologies that can support comprehensive assessment and efficiency among HR teams.

employer branding

With smarter recruitment technologies, you can access new talent pipelines and tools to holistically assess your candidates. With the use of pre-hire orientation materials, you can also support your candidate’s ability to select the right match for their needs.

 

How Virtual Reality Will Change Human Resources

human Resources virtual realityMost peoples’ experience or knowledge of augmented and virtual reality involves entertainment – for example, the Pokémon GO augmented reality app and the uber popular Epcot attraction Soarin’, which takes “riders” on a realistic virtual journey around the world.

Virtual reality (VR) has obvious entertainment value. And, as forward-thinking companies are discovering, it also has unlimited potential to revolutionize recruiting and training. Savvy human resources professionals are tapping into this technology to woo top talent, overcome geographic recruiting and training constraints, and cement their firms’ position as technologically advanced. The millennial and Gen Z workforces are drawn to cutting-edge technologies, and the “cool factor” of joining a workplace that embraces VR shouldn’t be underestimated. As the following five companies have discovered, VR is more than a gimmick: it’s a genuinely useful tool.

General Mills: Shows Rather than Tells

Most college students are familiar with on-campus recruiting events. Typically, they show up wearing their Sunday best and stroll from one table to the next meeting recruiters and collecting pamphlets or brochures. It’s necessary, but not necessarily exciting. General Mills has stepped up its recruiting game in a huge way. Candidates visiting with General Mills recruiters may be invited to don a headset and goggles and – thanks to a 360-degree GoPro video – take a VR tour around corporate headquarters and the Minneapolis-St. Paul metro area. They feel what it’s like to be an employee and experience the corporate culture first-hand. That recruiting approach is certain to leave an impression – a very positive one.

General Electric: Virtually Takes Candidates Where They Can’t Otherwise Go

Like General Mills, General Electric has discovered the benefit of using virtual reality in its recruiting efforts. For example, candidates can don a virtual reality headset to journey to the bottom of the sea and explore the company’s oil-and-gas recovery machines.

Lincoln Electric: Reduces Costs of and Increases Access to Training

Lincoln Electric has discovered that combining traditional and virtual training is a win-win for the company and employees. The company offers students the ability to practice on a virtual reality arc-welding trainer in addition to receiving traditional hands-on training. Studies show the combined approach leads to better communication and significantly higher certification rates.

Boeing: Offers On-the-Ground Flight Training

Boeing runs an Immersive Development Center in which its engineers test new parts and products, and pilots train in virtual reality flight simulators. Additionally, Boeing occasionally invites engineering students to the center so they can explore the company’s technologies, thanks to VR. All of Boeing’s engineers began as students, and the company’s recruiters hope that visiting students will one day return as employees.

Fidelity Investments: Researching VR App to Track Employee Benefits

With a realization that many people are visual learners, Fidelity Investments has created a prototype VR app to explain employee benefits. Users who don the headset are transported to a virtual boardroom populated with employees. Some employees are green, meaning their 401K investment strategy is sound. Other employees are red, indicating that it may be time to revise their strategy. The motivation behind the app is that viewing data in a three-dimensional matter makes it easier to digest.

Clearly, there’s widespread potential for human resources departments to embrace virtual reality. Companies are already using VR to recruit top talent, train existing employees and onboard new hires. How do you think these kinds of applications will change the way your HR and recruiting teams manage the future of your company’s talent?

5 Benefits You Need to Offer to Recruit Millennials

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By 2020, millennials will make up 46 percent of the workplace. And even though they have more student-loan debt on average than any other generation by far, they’re motivated much more by non-monetary and intangible work benefits. Consider adding these benefits to your roster to improve your millennial recruitment efforts.

1. The Benefit of Flexibility In Work Environments

For millennials, the days of working in cubicles from 9 to 5 are unstimulating and inefficient. They know great ideas aren’t the result of staring at white walls, and they don’t frame work within the confines of an eight-hour day. Get them on board by offering the freedom they crave. Allow remote work days, even if only twice a month, and create collaborative working spaces where they can mix, mingle and generate ideas with other colleagues.

2. The Benefit of High-Quality PTO

Millennials are willing to put in the hours, and they expect to be rewarded for it. Offering robust vacation packages and unlimited sick time tells them you care about their holistic health, happiness and well-being–something critical when they’re selecting an employer. It’s also crucial they feel you respect their time off, so avoid calling and emailing millennials while they are on vacation. Consequently, you’ll also improve retention.

3. Extend Your Wellness Benefits

Millennials are looking for more than health, vision and dental. They know they’re more engaged and productive at work if they’re active and healthy, and they expect you to understand that, too. A monthly stipend for a gym membership or a work-sponsored exercise program can go a long way toward bringing them on board.

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4. Provide the Benefit of Growth Opportunities

The quickest way to lose millennials is to let them grow stagnant. Millennials are eager to learn and want to be coached along the way. Give them opportunities to learn by having them attend workshops or conferences out of the office, or participate in a one-on-one mentoring or coaching program at the office. They’ll be more fulfilled, and as a bonus, they’ll keep getting better at what they’re doing for you.

5. Benefit Them by Showing Them They Matter

Millennials have a desire to understand how they make a difference. A recent study found that millennials value producing meaningful work more than receiving high pay. Make it clear their work makes an impact by having executive leadership transparently and regularly share company updates. Then, ask managers to follow up and tell their millennial team members exactly how they helped the company achieve its goals.

 

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