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new hire orientation

The One Thing Your New Hire Orientation Is Probably Missing

72 Hours To Inspire New Hire Engagement

After a new hire signs the appropriate forms for Human Resources, does your new hire process end – or do you have a new hire orientation program? Unfortunately, many companies mistake job training for onboarding. Companies offer top talent benefits and perks, interesting work and career opportunities during the recruitment process, and then it’s sink or swim from day one. Managers and Human Resource departments wonder why the people they so carefully selected never “fit in” and leave within a few years. The average employee tenure has decreased to 4.2 years per the U.S. Department of Labor.

So what is your new hire orientation missing? Likely, it’s a focus on creating immediate employee engagement. The importance of delivering a great onboarding experience is becoming more crucial as competition for top talent increases – and establishing your company as an employer of choice grows ever-more challenging.

Fitting In From Day One

New hire orientation has become a critical strategy for helping employees become productive as soon as possible. For a new employee, knowing that they are contributing to the company’s vision and mission has a positive effect on your company’s retention rates. Communicating your company’s larger purpose is a critical strategy for helping new employees assimilate into the company. Onboarding is an employee engagement, socialization and integration process as well as an orientation process. For this reason, many companies spend much of the first 72 hours of new employee onboarding helping the new hire understand the company’s culture and philosophy.

RELATED: HOW TO BUILD A UNION PROOF CULTURE FROM DAY ONE

A successful first 72 hours of onboarding will strengthen your corporate culture. New hires learn the mission of the company and the role they play in the company’s vision for a successful future. It’s a process that helps the new hire “fit in” from day one. The first hours of a new job today are busy ones – but in a different way than traditional orientation programs assumed. Much of the time involves leaders guiding new employees as they get comfortable in the workplace using a variety of communication tools, both online and off.

Four Best Practices for A  Spectacular First 72 Hours

Your organization needs a unique onboarding program to meet the needs of your unique culture and teams. The first 72 hours should be focused towards orienting the employee to the uniqueness of the organization, rather than sitting the person down with unfinished projects other employees may have left behind. Following are some best practices that make a new hire feel welcome, included and appreciated, while also providing critical information about the company and how it operates.

  1. Give the new hire a welcome message from the CEO or other top executives and managers. Give a tour and make introductions in person or via technology like video conferencing. LinkedIn has new recruits join other new hires for icebreakers with leaders sharing information about the company culture.
  2. Provide a company overview. Address topics like the organization’s mission, structure, benefits, and training and development opportunities. Much of this information is ideally delivered via robust new employee orientation videos and websites, designed to celebrate the new employee and welcome them while providing valuable information and often delivering the company’s union-free operating philosophy.
  3. Give the new hire an in-depth presentation on company core values. Zappos presents 10 core values to new hires and the history of those core values to create a bond. This presentation can also reinforce the company’s philosophy on unions because like Zappos, core values can include things like building a positive team and developing “honest relationships with communication” (transparency).
  4. Tell the story of the company, so the culture comes becomes tangible. Videos can present the organization’s history and successes, encouraging the employee to think, “I belong here and can contribute to future success.” At this point, the new hire should be feeling a bond with the company.

Don’t Stop There

Help the new hire begin writing their own company story by connecting them with other employees. Your effective, engagement-focused onboarding process should inspire new employees by sharing success stories of other team members via video. The new hire should feel excitement at the thought of making a unique contribution to organizational success and reinforcing the work culture. Videos of employees sharing inspiring work stories and of customers praising their relationship with the company are powerful engagement tools.

Want immediate engagement and loyalty? Before the new hire even arrives on the scene, make sure the tools they need are in place. Twitter has an onboarding process called “Yes-to-Desk”. When the Twitter new hire starts work, the computer, phone, access to systems and workspace already in place.

Assign your new hires a mentor or “buddy.” Assigning a go-to person who can give feedback and guide your most receptive minds is important. Google asks, doesn’t order, managers to consider assigning a peer buddy to each new hire. A mentor should not be the supervisor because the employee needs to feel comfortable asking questions and having work-related conversations. However, the mentor should also be someone who is highly engaged in your company’s culture and will help create greater engagement.

Discuss career development, expectations and opportunities to personalize the new hire orientation. In the first 72 hours, the information should set the tone and help the employee begin to solidify how he or she will fit in and contribute to the organization. The manager can begin engaging the new hire, in which conversations are held about performance targets.  A word of caution here: expecting an employee to “hit the ground running” is not fair to the new hire and can lead to missteps that haunt the person for a long time. Use this time to engage the new hire and get insight into their vision for their own future.

Institute ways to help new hires embrace company culture, no matter where the person is working. Today, many companies have remote workers, a situation that can make engagement that much more challenging. Mobile enabled onboarding and learning enables remote workers, as well as in-house employees, access to the onboarding program 24-7. L’Oréal’s Fit Culture App is a customized mobile app developed in-house that helps employees understand and live the company culture. It includes texts, videos, employee testimonials, games, real-life missions and the company story.  Most companies can utilize custom videos, web, and eLearning solutions. It’s more cost efficient and employers get access to expertise they may not have in-house.

RELATED: CREATE ENGAGED EMPLOYEES WITH 3 THREE EASY TIPS

New hire orientation should also help the new hire feel comfortable with the company’s technology – a source of immediate collaboration and engagement. Pinterest uses the first few days to promote collaboration. On day one, new hires meet for breakfast in the San Francisco headquarters. After breakfast, they learn “knitting” which is the company’s word for collaboration and seeing the world from different points of view. On the second day, the new hires learn about the Pinterest brand and how feedback is gathered from pinners. At the end of the second day, the person starts work and begins using the internal collaboration technology #Slack.

Be sure to establish metrics that let the organization know whether the onboarding program is effective. Metrics can be quantitative and qualitative. They include measuring the new hire’s engagement level, times the person accessed self-service learning opportunities, turnover, employee satisfaction with onboarding process and performance over a period of time. Google measures results with real data from onboarding initiatives and gets feedback on what the person would change.

At the End of the Day

In order to overcome the missing element of engagement, your onboarding process needs structure. In the “old days” people started their new jobs with little guidance, and much of that guidance was geared at job-specific training.

The first few days of your new hire orientation should be a mix of interactive learning and face-to-face socialization with coworkers, supervisors and managers. When is a person fully assimilated? Michael Watkins, author of The First 90 Days says it depends on the job. High level employees transitioning within the company may take six months, but if coming from the outside, it may be a year. An effective onboarding program can shorten that time considerably. True engagement happens when the new hire truly believe they are a contributing part of the team and drive the desired culture.

There are many onboarding software programs available today. Self-service new hire portals can give employees access to HR forms, policies and procedures, company philosophies on things like unions and customer service, video messages from executives, explanations of benefits, online tours, virtual teams, communication systems, and more. Custom videos, web and eLearning solutions can begin and continue the new hire’s assimilation process.

Successful leaders understand that employee engagement begins on day one but continues as long as the person is working for the company. After the first 72 hours, the real work of socialization accelerates. Some companies like AdTheorent have executive breakfasts within a short time period with new employees to talk about the company’s vision in a relaxed setting. Over the early months, new hires spend time with team members and attend lunches, dinners and team cocktail events. In the final analysis, the key takeaway is that new hire orientation for an  employee in the first 72 hours can bring long-term positive results for the organization.

Grab your free New Hire Orientation Checklist here.

Ready to talk about developing your new hire strategy? Combine Projections’ video, web and eLearning solutions to create a robust and engaging program. Let’s chat now about your company’s unique plan for new hire engagement! 

Increase Employee Engagement

Increase Employee Engagement With These 3 Easy Tips

According to a recent Gallup poll, companies with a high rate of engaged employees rates are 21 percent more productive.

So, that leads us to the idea that having employees who are happy and committed to their work is an essential part of your company’s long-term success. Working to increase employee engagement can help to decrease turnover costs while boosting efficiency and productivity.

Now that we’ve made the case for paying attention to engagement, it’s also vital to mention that a failure to focus on what your employees need will put your company in a compromised position, far more so than any competitor or shift in the market.

We’ve got some quick, actionable tips for improving employee engagement that are by no means a cure-all, but still an excellent starting place! (Read through to the end for some ideas on taking your employee engagement efforts to the next level.)

1. Increase Employee Engagement by Increasing Your Team’s Confidence in Leadership

A Darwin Survey performed a few years ago found that the most important factor in employee loyalty and engagement was confidence in leadership.

Employees want to feel like they are being managed by someone who has vision and experience. The best way to make yourself a better leader is by striving to improve your skill set and industry knowledge.

Some leaders try rest on their laurels, which can lead to big problems. Continuing your education and staying up-to-date on developments within your industry can make your company stronger and your engaged employees more productive.

Your employee engagement efforts

2. Increase Employee Engagement By Working to Improve Company Culture

In short, your company’s culture is a combination of how you interact with your employees and how they interact with each other.

Your job as a leader is to keep your finger on the pulse of your company’s culture. When you have to address interpersonal problems within your company, avoid “meddling” in the personal affairs of your employees. Being completely objective and professional can help you avoid showing favoritism when issues like this arise while you are trying to create engaged employees.

Remember that a solid culture is built on trust and consistency, and that providing your leaders – those who interact with employees daily – with ongoing training can inspire the exact kind of engagement you’re looking for.

And on that note…

3. Increase Employee Engagement By Providing Adequate Training and Equipment

One of the most common sources of employee frustration is a lack of training. This is crucial in the early days of employment, and a well-thought out onboarding process is a large part of future engagement.

If an employee feels like they have not been given the knowledge or tools needed to do their job correctly, they will start to seek other employment opportunities. In fact, the Work Institute reported that 34% of turnover occurred in the first year of employment.

Focus on providing ongoing training to create engaged employees. Vary the medium to engage today’s employees, and take advantage of online video and highly interactive eLearning. Custom solutions are often the best choice when you want to create greater employee engagement while building your company’s best culture.

Next-level engagement solutions for your company may incorporate social media, dedicated websites, shareable content and video, and even continuous feedback loop solutions such as warble and 15five.

Looking for ways to connect with your employees? The team at Projections offers custom video, websites and eLearning, specifically crafted to engage and inspire employees! For over 40 years, Projections has helped employers just like you keep their teams engaged and productive, helping companies create a UnionProof culture from day one, and a reputation as an employer of choice!

DIY Video for Employee Communications

DIY Video for Employee Communications

You might think it’s a bit strange for a company who produces professional-quality video for companies to give advice on “do it yourself” video for HR. But employees, especially millennial employees, crave engagement, and HR departments are increasingly expected to communicate regularly with their workforce on both routine and critical issues. Videos can be a great way to communicate with employees and deepen engagement, but, really, should you create your own content? This article will consider the pros and cons of HR departments shooting their own employee communication videos – and you might be surprised!

1. There Are Plenty of Ways to Make Great Employee Videos From Scratch

Do you have an iPhone? Good news, you’re an amateur filmmaker. Gone are the days when you needed to buy dedicated camera equipment. That phone in your pocket can take high-definition video and can usually autocorrect for poor lighting. There are a number of simple things you can do to make those handheld videos look better. Try spending 30 minutes to create consistent lighting conditions throughout your set (or if outside, try to minimize glare from the sun). You can also use multiple iPhones to get different angles. Newer models even shoot video in 4K, though this resolution will consume a great deal of memory. Even these basic techniques can give your videos greater credibility but once you use editing software, the quality of your content improves exponentially.

2. Tips and Tricks for Making Great-Looking Videos

Many amateur filmmakers use Apple’s iMovie, an incredibly powerful software platform that can make short films look fantastic. The software even allows you to start editing on your iPhone before finishing on a Mac. Once you start using iMovie, it makes sense to upgrade your other equipment to get the most out of the software. A good microphone will help capture high-quality audio, and a proper lighting rig goes a long way to make sure your subjects and set are appropriately lit. You can find royalty-free music on sites such as Premium Beat and Pond unless you intend to create your own. iMovie includes a large suite of editing tools such as time lapses, color correction and special effects. While these tools make your videos look great, it can take many months to fully understand how to use the software to its full potential.

3. Mission-Critical Videos Require Outside Professionals

Technology has evolved to the point that with limited skill, you can create a great looking employee video. With a little editing and touch-ups, homemade videos can be distributed throughout your organization. However, mission-critical communications require a professional touch. During periods of heightened tension such as union organizing, layoffs or restructuring, you want to make sure your video surgically communicates the right message to the right audience. You only get one shot in corporate communications, and mistakes can be quickly broadcast on national news and social media. Everyone wants to go viral, but not for the wrong reasons. The good news is that there the team at Projections can provide first-class employee communication videos when the stakes really matter. Projections specializes in labor relations and provides award-winning, highly effective corporate communication tools for onboarding, union organizing campaigns, benefits rollouts, changes (such as facility closings or corporate restructuring), and especially for training and educating your workforce.

A great way to deepen employee engagement is first-class videos, websites and e-learning. Showing your team members that you value their ongoing education is vital for morale and employee retention – not to mention your reputation as an employer of choice. The equipment needed to create quality videos is increasingly affordable, and there are a number of software tools to make your videos look more professional. For routine communications, creating your own videos is probably fine. For critical communications with your broader workforce, such as union avoidance, look to a professional that specializes in corporate communications to ensure your videos are focused enough to convey the right message to the right audience when it really matters.

Engagement Efforts

11 Subtle Signs Your Engagement Efforts May Not Be Working

A motivated, happy workforce doesn’t just benefit your company with increased productivity and better quarterly revenues. Employee engagement also guarantees that you get to retain your best employees, enjoy a higher level of staff loyalty, stave off nascent union organizing and ensure your company remains innovative and competitive going forward.

With that in mind, let’s examine the most common warning signs that suggest your employees aren’t as motivated or engaged as you’d like them to be.

1. Happy to Be Mediocre

Everyone knows teams or individuals who are content to be “just good enough.” Yes, they’re hitting their targets, but box-ticking metrics aren’t the stuff of great companies. Try to develop a culture that inspires your employees to want to become excellent in everything they do.

2. Defensiveness

Most employees should be fine with taking constructive criticism; ideally, they should be actively seeking it out. Unfortunately, some resist feedback, and this can be a sign of increasing withdrawal, both in the workplace and elsewhere.

3. Shying Away From Risk

Some employees can be overly protective of their own status quo. Not wanting to be blamed for failure, they shun any risk at all.

4. Reluctance to Grow in Their Personal Relationships

Regardless of the specific benefits that your company enjoys from good interpersonal relationships among your staff, it is a universal truth that bad employee interactions are always a net detriment to productivity. Having employees who won’t work on maintaining or fixing good relationships is a sure sign of trouble further down the line.

5. Resistance to Change

Changes to workplace practices can often trigger a natural and subconscious resistance in employees, which should be predicted and managed as such and even leveraged as a coaching or training opportunity. Regardless, it should only be a temporary reaction and dissolve over time. However, when employees demonstrate a chronic and obstinate desire to stay stuck in their ways, it may be an indicator of other, more serious, underlying issues.

6. Avoiding Experimentation

Not dissimilar to the desire to shun risk, a lack of interest in experimentation suggests that your employees have grown bored with their work and encounter a lack of stimulation and curiosity in what they do.

7. They Blame Culture

Employees who excuse their own work by finding fault in someone else’s show a lack of accountability. They never learn from their mistakes.

8. They Won’t Grow Their Skills

It shouldn’t be a hard sell to get your employees to expand their skill set and make themselves more valuable in the process. If some of your staff are reluctant to engage with workplace training and ignore offers of educational opportunities, you might want to explore it with them further in a bid to address any preexisting concerns.

9. The Sound of Gossip

We know gossip when we hear it, and in the workplace, it’s never a good thing. Not only does it decrease team cohesiveness, damage morale and inculcate a negative atmosphere, it’s also a consistent precursor to the beginnings of union organizing in your firm. Rumors and hearsay can spread false notions and add fuel to the fire that union officials rely on.

10. Jealousy

If you get that feeling that some of your employees are jealous of others, or that there’s a rift between a department or two borne out of a feeling of inequity, it’s definitely worth investigating. What might appear as a sense of petty injustice can have large ramifications on labor relations further down the line.

11. Attendance Issues

And, finally, what could be more indicative of disengagement than your staff not turning up to work in the first place? Fortunately, this is usually one of the last signs to manifest itself, giving you plenty of opportunity to address the problem beforehand.

If you’re witnessing any of these signs of failing employee engagement, it’s not too late! In fact, its testament to your commitment to your teams that you’re aware of their needs. Now is the time to begin connecting, and you can use powerfully consistent video messages, highly interactive eLearning and dedicated websites to create an innovative, engaged workforce.

This One Thing Will Help You Connect With Employees

Video is easily the preferred medium for consuming information, and is rapidly outdistancing other options for ease and versatility. Recent data shows that video is expected to be responsible for 82 percent of online traffic by 2021. So, if you’re not already incorporating video in your internal communications, you may be missing out on an opportunity to connect with your employees.

Video Enhances the Effectiveness of Internal Communications

When you use video as a communication channel, you increase the effectiveness of internal communications. People remember only 10 percent of the information they hear; however, they remember 65 percent of that information if it’s accompanied by a relevant picture.

You can use videos to improve employees’ understanding of an important topic, such as union organizing.  A video used during a union organizing drive to effectively communicate the facts about joining a union before the employees make the commitment will drastically help your cause.

Video Is a Familiar Medium

Today’s employees are accustomed to consuming their information, news and entertainment via video. A 2013 Pew Research Center study found that 50 percent of adults watched educational videos online. YouTube’s educational content via YouTube EDU is an example of the exponential growth of video-based instructional content online. In 2011, YouTube EDU started with 500,000 educational videos and doubled its viewership by 2012. In addition, academic enrollment in online courses is growing by nearly 3.9 percent annually, with thousands of online courses, saving $130 billion on certification and corporate training annually for organizations.

Video Enhances Training Sessions

When you hold training sessions, capturing and maintaining your audience’s attention just by speaking alone may be limiting your employees’ learning experiences. However, when you incorporate a video into a training session, it helps support what the live training is trying to communicate to your employees while enhancing their learning experience. Video combined with a live trainer is better than a live trainer alone for a variety of reasons:

  • Consistency. Delivering a consistent and thorough message regardless of turnover in human resources personnel is vital to the company’s success, especially when considering new hire employees.
  • Clarity. Stage fright can impact the effectiveness of the presentation. However, when your trainer can use a video for part of the presentation, nervousness subsides, and your training sessions are more likely to be successful.
  • Access. When you include video in your training content, you’re facilitating your audience’s access to information. Online streaming also helps enhance your employees’ learning experience by enabling them to access information anytime and anywhere.

Videos are useful for breaking down important or complex information into digestible content that is shown over time. For example, you can stretch out complex topics regarding union organizing into discussions that are shared and released to employees weekly. This can include releasing a topic on strikes in the first week, on job security in the second week, on collective bargaining in the third week, and additional topics in the weeks that follow — such as union dues and finances, union card signing and how unions organize.

Final Thoughts

Using video is a modern and helpful method to connect with your staff. Employing videos in your training sessions doesn’t have to be complicated or a solo job. Whether you’re looking for innovative training approaches to provide managers with union avoidance tips or you want to educate employees on union organizing, working with a professional team with experience in producing videos for employees ensures you provide relevant, engaging and memorable content.

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