Category Archives for Human Resources

Corporate Collective Consciousness

Can you guess the movie from these famous quotes?

“Toto, I’ve got a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore.”

“May the Force be with you.”

“Here’s looking at you, kid.”

Chances are, you guessed all three. These quotes have become part of our collective consciousness. Nearly everybody recognizes them, even if they’ve never seen the original movie.

Does your company have a good corporate culture and collective consciousness, too? Everyone in your organization should share the same values, attitudes, and ideas. Everyone should be reading from the same page. But it doesn’t always work like this. What gives?

RELATED: Union Organizing Why Your Employer Brand Matters

Things Your Employees Inherently Know

There are things that every one of your employees inherently knows. They know what time they start work, what time they finish, where the vending machines are.

But do your employees know about your company mission and corporate culture? Your long-term strategic goals? Your morals, values, and beliefs?

Probably not. At least, most of them don’t. In fact, 61 percent of employees are completely unaware of their company’s mission statement. The majority of those who do (57 percent) say they feel uninspired by it.

The problem is, most employee orientation programs just aren’t good enough. They introduce employees to their new role but don’t focus on company culture and long-term development.

It’s no wonder, then, that most of your staff have no clue about your company’s values, ethics and corporate culture.

How to Improve Collective Consciousness

Want to improve your company’s collective consciousness? You need to engage with your employees, from their first interview to their final day in the office. Here’s how:

Make the Message Loud and Clear for Good Corporate Culture

If your employees are unaware of your mission statement, you probably aren’t communicating it clearly enough. List your goals and values on your website, on your social media pages, and in your employee orientation literature.

Be More Transparent

Business transparency is crucial for employee engagement. Your manager should be visible and friendly; your HR team should be approachable and willing to answer questions from your employees.

RELATED: Leading With Transparency and Empathy

Use the Latest Technology

The latest technology will help you communicate your message and improve collective consciousness. Employee orientation videos, for example, enhance the onboarding process, improve employee conduct and manage expectations. Your new hires are more likely to remember the information you’re telling them, too — 65 percent of people are visual learners.

Follow the tips on this list, and your company’s values, ethics, and goals will soon be as recognizable as all those famous movies quotes that everyone can roll off their tongue.

employee communication and digital marketing

Shouting into the Void: Employee Communication and Digital Marketing

There are 287 million internet users in the United States. It’s safe to say, then, that most people, if not everyone, in your organization use the internet on a regular basis. As your employees spend more of their time online, you have more opportunities for engagement. Now you can use the same techniques digital marketers use to build your company culture, connect with workers and promote positive employee relations. But how you do it? Here are several ways to connect employee communication and digital marketing

Why Should You Communicate With Employees Online?

As an HR and labor relation pro, you know the drill. Sometimes communicating with employees is a challenge — you feel like no one’s listening. You probably get questions from workers that you’ve already answered. Did these employees just forget what you told them? Or were they even listening in the first place?
Consider thinking of your employee communications like digital marketing. This approach allows you to get your message across in an innovative way. Workers are more likely to retain important info, and you can foster positive employee relations. Digital marketing is a powerful tool that lets you engage with workers in your organization. It’s “an umbrella term for all your online marketing efforts,” says software development and marketing company, HubSpot. This term encompasses methods like Google search, email, websites, online video and social media.

How Can You Use Digital Marketing to Engage Employees?

HR pros are using digital marketing techniques today to target employees and create a UnionProof culture. One type of digital marketing method, email automation, for example, lets you send automated marketing messages to staff about relevant and timely topics. Automation can also be a powerful tool for onboarding new employees, with just the right amount of information delivered at just the right time. Automated emails can include links to video messaging, downloadable resources, company handbook, and more. Later, you can also educate employees on right-to-work laws, authorization cards, dues and other information specific to your UnionProof culture. You can communicate your union-free philosophy and inspire workers to take specific actions.
Another aspect of digital marketing, social media, can help you build your culture of engagement by featuring positive employee relations stories from inside the company. Create your online presence as an employer of choice with benefits for new hires, a new hire orientation video, and current industry and legal updates that resonate with employees at your company.
Unlike traditional advertising, digital marketing lets you track your communications with employees. Discover, for example, whether staff read your emails or liked your social media posts. “Digital analytics play a crucial role in nearly every enterprise’s digital marketing strategy, not only for tracking and measuring website traffic but for tracking and measuring other digital channels, as well,” says Marketing Land. “With the explosive growth of social media, video, and mobile, the importance of understanding the contributions and relationships of these channels to website traffic and conversions has increased significantly.”
social media monitoring

Traditional vs. Digital Marketing

In the past, HR teams sent employees paper-based communications like newsletters. These took a long time to complete, and there were no guarantees that employees would even read them. Digital marketing methods, on the other hand, increase the likelihood of staff reading your messages. Research shows that the average person checks his or her email 15 times and spends 35 minutes on Facebook every single day.
Therefore, digital marketing is a great way to promote labor relations. You can update your Instagram and Twitter feeds with the latest developments in union avoidance, for example, or attract more people to your organization with search engine optimization (SEO).

What Are the Best Digital Marketing Techniques?

You can incorporate various methods into your digital marketing strategy. Here are some techniques that you can use.
  • Promote your company’s objectives and values on social media with the right hashtags. Who knows, someone with hundreds of thousands of followers might see your message and post it on their page.
  • Advertise events that promote union-free workplaces on your website or blog. It’s just like pinning an ad on your office noticeboard, but employees are more likely to take notice of your message. Encourage your social media followers to like, share and comment on your content, too.
  • Use pay-per-click advertising to increase the number of people who visit your website and blog. This type of search engine marketing increases the visibility of your organization and its core values on websites like Google and Bing.

What Else?

There are other digital marketing methods, too. Content marketing, for example, lets you incorporate information about your company and its union-free philosophy on your blog. You can create compelling content — what it’s like to work for your company, for example — and post information about employee orientation and staff training.
Text messaging lets you send short marketing messages to mobile devices — perfect if you need to notify employees quickly. This is an effective communication tool: Collectively, Americans check their phones 8 billion times per day.
Live online events are just as effective. Webinars, for example, let you communicate union-free practices and HR-related topics to audiences around the world. All you need is a computer or mobile and an internet connection.
Finally, online video is a powerful tool for employee communications. Use it for orientation and training.
Still haven’t incorporated digital marketing into your workplace? Using marketing methods like SEO, social media, email automation, live events and video promotes your company culture, improves communications and lets you engage with employees on a much deeper level.
social media video

3 Reasons You Should Be Using Social Media for Recruiting

With all of the online options available to job seekers today, human resources departments have to be strategic when posting available positions. Recruiters often think to look for candidates on employment sites, their own company websites and even local community job boards, and up to 70% of recruiters are now utilizing social media. So why should you use social media for recruiting? Social media offers three clear benefits that  job posting websites do not.

1. Social Media for Recruiting Is Cost-Effective

Unlike many job posting sites, the cost for social media can be very minimal. Campaigns can be set up per impression or per click (also known as Pay-Per-Click advertising). Facebook and LinkedIn offer date-bound options so you can end the campaign at a particular day and time. Both platforms also allow advertisers to set a total budget the platforms algorithms distribute the campaign funds over the lifetime of the campaign. This works well if you have a small team that cannot monitor the campaign every day.

Social Media for recruiting

2. Social Media for Recruiting Allows You To Target Your Audience

Social media also offers the benefit of creating specific, targeted audiences. Facebook and LinkedIn both allow advertisers to create custom audiences based on a wide variety of demographics, from identifying people near your chosen location to current job titles, education, and salary. This provides the opportunity for recruiters to zero in on the most qualified talent for the position. A word of caution here, though: the ultra-specific audience targeting available through these social media sites may limit the number and type of candidates you see. Remember to broaden your scope as needed to ensure you consider a well-rounded applicant pool.

3. Social Media for Recruiting Gives You The Power To Track Conversions

The final reason social media should be used as part of every human resources recruitment strategy  is the ability to easily track conversions and see measurable results. Knowing how well your advertising worked is important to help justify the dollars that are spent on recruitment efforts. On social media, you can view your campaign’s performance and evaluate how many people have seen your ad, interacted with your ad, and even clicked over to the job description or application page. There are a variety of parameters you can choose from for tracking conversions. Your definition of “conversion” can be set as a website click through, interacting with your ad, or even just as simply as how many people saw the ad. So, your conversion can be customized based on how your department wants to analyze results and define success.

Are your leaders utilizing social media as well? Social media can be a powerful internal tool, that improves engagement and brings outstanding candidates to your door. Make sure your leaders are trained in the soft skills and people skills that create an environment where employees thrive and unions aren’t necessary.

Remember too that your recruitment efforts can be influenced by your overall employer brand online. When you take the time to produce video about what it’s like to work for your company, post regularly about your positive employee relations, or dig in to your LinkedIn Company and LinkedIn Career pages, it speaks volumes about the pride people feel in working there. When you’re ready to launch your social media recruiting strategy, be sure to consider all the factors, including where your ideal client spends time on line, and which platforms appeal to the ideal candidate for your available positions.

Social media for recruiting

Discrimination Harassment Policies

Anti-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment Policies

Discrimination and harassment don’t just damage workplace morale and cause you to lose valuable personnel — they can also place your company at risk for ruinous lawsuits. The average court settlement for a discrimination or harassment lawsuit comes to about $125,000; harassment trials have resulted in awards of up to $168 million. If you want to protect both your workers and your business, the logical place to start is with strong, clear anti-discrimination and anti-harassment policies

What the Laws Say

It’s relatively easy to figure out what your anti-discrimination and anti-harassment policies need to convey by looking at the applicable laws. Workplaces throughout the U.S. are subject to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This law prohibits discrimination based on race, sex, religion, national origin, and color. Title VII also prohibits any kind of harassment based on these same characteristics, considering it a form of discrimination.
Federal law isn’t the only law you may need to consider. Your state may have its own particular laws prohibiting harassment based on marital status, gender identity, or other particulars not covered by title VII. Make sure you understand the laws for the state or states in which you do business.

Creating Your Anti-Discrimination Policies

While you can create separate anti-discrimination and anti-harassment policies, the overlap between these two terms means you can also write a single policy encompassing both behaviors. Start by clearly and unequivocally stating your company’s “zero tolerance” for discrimination and harassment.
Name as many protected characteristics as apply to you on the federal and state level. Since small but significant additions to these laws may occur at any time, and since it’s always possible to omit something by mistake, hedge your bets by adding a blanket statement covering any other protected characteristics currently included under the law.

Education and Enforcement

Don’t assume that your employees automatically understand which actions constitute discrimination or harassment. Spelling out specific examples in your written policies can help everyone understand exactly what’s acceptable and what isn’t. Give detailed instructions on how to report any instance of discrimination or harassment experienced or witnessed by the employee. Explain the disciplinary actions that management may take, up to and including termination, as well as the available options for employees accused of discrimination or harassment. Projections’ online harassment training can serve as an invaluable reinforcement to these efforts.
Last but not least, make sure your workers have agreed to uphold your policies. Include the policies in the employee handbook every new hire receives, and require each employee to sign a statement agreeing to conform to them. You’ll rest a lot easier once you’ve set the groundwork for a discrimination-free, harassment-free workplace!
new hire orientation

The One Thing Your New Hire Orientation Is Probably Missing

72 Hours To Inspire New Hire Engagement

After a new hire signs the appropriate forms for Human Resources, does your new hire process end – or do you have a new hire orientation program? Unfortunately, many companies mistake job training for onboarding. Companies offer top talent benefits and perks, interesting work and career opportunities during the recruitment process, and then it’s sink or swim from day one. Managers and Human Resource departments wonder why the people they so carefully selected never “fit in” and leave within a few years. The average employee tenure has decreased to 4.2 years per the U.S. Department of Labor.

So what is your new hire orientation missing? Likely, it’s a focus on creating immediate employee engagement. The importance of delivering a great onboarding experience is becoming more crucial as competition for top talent increases – and establishing your company as an employer of choice grows ever-more challenging.

Fitting In From Day One

New hire orientation has become a critical strategy for helping employees become productive as soon as possible. For a new employee, knowing that they are contributing to the company’s vision and mission has a positive effect on your company’s retention rates. Communicating your company’s larger purpose is a critical strategy for helping new employees assimilate into the company. Onboarding is an employee engagement, socialization and integration process as well as an orientation process. For this reason, many companies spend much of the first 72 hours of new employee onboarding helping the new hire understand the company’s culture and philosophy.

RELATED: HOW TO BUILD A UNION PROOF CULTURE FROM DAY ONE

A successful first 72 hours of onboarding will strengthen your corporate culture. New hires learn the mission of the company and the role they play in the company’s vision for a successful future. It’s a process that helps the new hire “fit in” from day one. The first hours of a new job today are busy ones – but in a different way than traditional orientation programs assumed. Much of the time involves leaders guiding new employees as they get comfortable in the workplace using a variety of communication tools, both online and off.

Four Best Practices for A  Spectacular First 72 Hours

Your organization needs a unique onboarding program to meet the needs of your unique culture and teams. The first 72 hours should be focused towards orienting the employee to the uniqueness of the organization, rather than sitting the person down with unfinished projects other employees may have left behind. Following are some best practices that make a new hire feel welcome, included and appreciated, while also providing critical information about the company and how it operates.

  1. Give the new hire a welcome message from the CEO or other top executives and managers. Give a tour and make introductions in person or via technology like video conferencing. LinkedIn has new recruits join other new hires for icebreakers with leaders sharing information about the company culture.
  2. Provide a company overview. Address topics like the organization’s mission, structure, benefits, and training and development opportunities. Much of this information is ideally delivered via robust new employee orientation videos and websites, designed to celebrate the new employee and welcome them while providing valuable information and often delivering the company’s union-free operating philosophy.
  3. Give the new hire an in-depth presentation on company core values. Zappos presents 10 core values to new hires and the history of those core values to create a bond. This presentation can also reinforce the company’s philosophy on unions because like Zappos, core values can include things like building a positive team and developing “honest relationships with communication” (transparency).
  4. Tell the story of the company, so the culture comes becomes tangible. Videos can present the organization’s history and successes, encouraging the employee to think, “I belong here and can contribute to future success.” At this point, the new hire should be feeling a bond with the company.

Don’t Stop There

Help the new hire begin writing their own company story by connecting them with other employees. Your effective, engagement-focused onboarding process should inspire new employees by sharing success stories of other team members via video. The new hire should feel excitement at the thought of making a unique contribution to organizational success and reinforcing the work culture. Videos of employees sharing inspiring work stories and of customers praising their relationship with the company are powerful engagement tools.

Want immediate engagement and loyalty? Before the new hire even arrives on the scene, make sure the tools they need are in place. Twitter has an onboarding process called “Yes-to-Desk”. When the Twitter new hire starts work, the computer, phone, access to systems and workspace already in place.

Assign your new hires a mentor or “buddy.” Assigning a go-to person who can give feedback and guide your most receptive minds is important. Google asks, doesn’t order, managers to consider assigning a peer buddy to each new hire. A mentor should not be the supervisor because the employee needs to feel comfortable asking questions and having work-related conversations. However, the mentor should also be someone who is highly engaged in your company’s culture and will help create greater engagement.

Discuss career development, expectations and opportunities to personalize the new hire orientation. In the first 72 hours, the information should set the tone and help the employee begin to solidify how he or she will fit in and contribute to the organization. The manager can begin engaging the new hire, in which conversations are held about performance targets.  A word of caution here: expecting an employee to “hit the ground running” is not fair to the new hire and can lead to missteps that haunt the person for a long time. Use this time to engage the new hire and get insight into their vision for their own future.

Institute ways to help new hires embrace company culture, no matter where the person is working. Today, many companies have remote workers, a situation that can make engagement that much more challenging. Mobile enabled onboarding and learning enables remote workers, as well as in-house employees, access to the onboarding program 24-7. L’Oréal’s Fit Culture App is a customized mobile app developed in-house that helps employees understand and live the company culture. It includes texts, videos, employee testimonials, games, real-life missions and the company story.  Most companies can utilize custom videos, web, and eLearning solutions. It’s more cost efficient and employers get access to expertise they may not have in-house.

RELATED: CREATE ENGAGED EMPLOYEES WITH 3 THREE EASY TIPS

New hire orientation should also help the new hire feel comfortable with the company’s technology – a source of immediate collaboration and engagement. Pinterest uses the first few days to promote collaboration. On day one, new hires meet for breakfast in the San Francisco headquarters. After breakfast, they learn “knitting” which is the company’s word for collaboration and seeing the world from different points of view. On the second day, the new hires learn about the Pinterest brand and how feedback is gathered from pinners. At the end of the second day, the person starts work and begins using the internal collaboration technology #Slack.

Be sure to establish metrics that let the organization know whether the onboarding program is effective. Metrics can be quantitative and qualitative. They include measuring the new hire’s engagement level, times the person accessed self-service learning opportunities, turnover, employee satisfaction with onboarding process and performance over a period of time. Google measures results with real data from onboarding initiatives and gets feedback on what the person would change.

At the End of the Day

In order to overcome the missing element of engagement, your onboarding process needs structure. In the “old days” people started their new jobs with little guidance, and much of that guidance was geared at job-specific training.

The first few days of your new hire orientation should be a mix of interactive learning and face-to-face socialization with coworkers, supervisors and managers. When is a person fully assimilated? Michael Watkins, author of The First 90 Days says it depends on the job. High level employees transitioning within the company may take six months, but if coming from the outside, it may be a year. An effective onboarding program can shorten that time considerably. True engagement happens when the new hire truly believe they are a contributing part of the team and drive the desired culture.

There are many onboarding software programs available today. Self-service new hire portals can give employees access to HR forms, policies and procedures, company philosophies on things like unions and customer service, video messages from executives, explanations of benefits, online tours, virtual teams, communication systems, and more. Custom videos, web and eLearning solutions can begin and continue the new hire’s assimilation process.

Successful leaders understand that employee engagement begins on day one but continues as long as the person is working for the company. After the first 72 hours, the real work of socialization accelerates. Some companies like AdTheorent have executive breakfasts within a short time period with new employees to talk about the company’s vision in a relaxed setting. Over the early months, new hires spend time with team members and attend lunches, dinners and team cocktail events. In the final analysis, the key takeaway is that new hire orientation for an  employee in the first 72 hours can bring long-term positive results for the organization.

Grab your free New Hire Orientation Checklist here.

Ready to talk about developing your new hire strategy? Combine Projections’ video, web and eLearning solutions to create a robust and engaging program. Let’s chat now about your company’s unique plan for new hire engagement! 

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