Category Archives for Corporate Social Media

The Social Side of Employee Communication

Employee engagement is a persistent problem for organizations around the world for many reasons. They include increasing use of remote workers, technology that makes interpersonal communication less personal, generational differences in work expectations and communication styles, the inability to clearly separate work and personal lives, poor leadership skills and employees feeling undervalued.

The Social Mindset Is a Bond

Engagement exists when empowered employees feel connected to their work and the organization, but each person in your organization experiences engagement in a different way. For this reason, developing high engagement levels begins with developing an organizational “social mindset” in which a sense of community is created. Unions have mastered this concept, making their members feel like they’re in an exclusive club with leaders who really listen, and will champion their causes and go to bat for them when issues arise. Unions regularly communicate with their members, using social media tools and personal meetings, to keep the connection strong and inspire feelings of empowerment. The union social mindset is a bond that unites everyone around a common cause.

Social factors are important to all employees but especially to millennials. They’re always connected via social media, but social media by itself isn’t guaranteed to engage people or promote optimal communication. Too many employers miss the link between a social mindset and engagement. Social media is an engagement tool, but if your organization doesn’t develop a social mindset, your employees won’t utilize the social tools to their greatest advantage. Your employees’ behaviors are indicative of a lack of social mindset. For example, low utilization of an enterprise-wide social media system or lack of response to a manager’s feedback on a project in progress or failure to participate on coworker teams, are a few indications that your employees don’t view themselves as important contributors to a cohesive team of workers.

An organization with a social mindset focuses on its people and is key to creating a culture of inclusion in which people thrive. Creating an organization with a social mindset requires giving people the right tools, but the tools must empower people to learn what they need and want to learn to achieve the highest performance level and to learn when they want to learn. It must be a collaborative learning journey in which people learn from each other, and have access to on-demand learning and access to internal and external communities that enable continuous learning. A social mindset means employees utilize all online and offline social systems to autonomously manage their jobs with a clear understanding of how their work contributes to organizational goals. They see themselves as proactive team members doing important work.

Self-Empowerment

Engagement actually emanates from the ability of employees to self-empower. Your organization is unique from all others. It’s why you’ve achieved competitive success. The uniqueness drives the need for the development of an internal communication system that specifically resonates with your employees. The communication system consists of tools that are available to the entire workforce; consistent, tailored messaging; regular management feedback; and leaders with effective communication skills. Engaging your workforce in a meaningful way also requires providing content that adds value to their work and is easily understood.

Millennials prefer information delivered quickly and with visual aids, and user-friendly communication platforms that include video, web, and eLearning communication tools. Of course, mobile platforms are a necessity in the eyes of your younger employees. This creates the seamless communication system that accommodates the ‘where and when’ learning and communication needs. Engaging employees requires you to encourage all people to participate in the business, including remote workers, and to provide opportunities for improving processes. Meetings can encourage people to ask questions rather than expecting people to passively learn the material. Technology-based training programs are interactive. Leader feedback encourages stretch thinking. This is how you develop a social learning organization.

Self-Motivated and Committed Employees

Various researchers have determined that employee engagement recognizes an employee’s psychological state, behaviors, and linkages between engagement and employee satisfaction. Satisfaction is not enough though. Engaged employees are committed to the organization’s mission, self-motivated and passionate about their work. Your organization’s communication system is an essential element in the engagement process, but only if it stimulates constructive conversations and positive behaviors.

Southwest Airlines is an example of a company that has created a social mindset. Employees are encouraged to collaborate, participate in decision-making and explore work activities outside their regular jobs. Employees across the organization were encouraged to share new ideas for uniforms, and one of the flight attendants chosen to participate on a final design committee called it an “unforgettable experience.” Southwest Airlines considers social media as a means for relationship building with and between employees and customers because it gives the company the ability to connect people across teams and cultures.

Airbnb creates an employee experience which considers physical, emotional, aspirational, intellectual and virtual (collaborative technologies) aspects. The collaborative technologies are used to communicate the company culture and hold an online live-streamed weekly meeting, and employees are encouraged to use WhatsApp to share learning, photos, and insights. This enables the company to create a social mindset by opening communication up to all employees around the world.

An Organizing Model for Employers

Previously a labor organizer, author Jane McAlevey shared her experiences and perspectives on union organizing in “Raising Expectations (and Raising Hell)” and proposed a union-building operational model in “No Shortcuts: Organizing for Power in the New Gilded Age.” She points out that mobilizing may bring large numbers of people into the battle for employee rights but these are people already committed. To build a strong union, its leaders must expand its base to include ordinary people who were never involved in organizing. They do this by helping ordinary people understand they hold the power and can achieve desired outcomes.

Her basic operating model has several major elements that include: deep organizing in which indifferent people are attracted; full-worker organizing in which all working people are made to understand they are members of a community and have untapped potential; building unity across classes of people; developing organic leaders who create a social force capable of exercising power; and tracking every worker’s participation in the workplace and the community to better engage them in the union learning and development processes.

Creating the Social Context

McAlevey’s model is an engagement model. As an employer, you must understand an engaging communication system in your organization makes it possible for all employees to participate, exercise their power to contribute to organizational success and create a social force. The social mindset encourages people to fully participate in the communication process by providing context.

It’s not a passive system. It proactively embraces the disengaged, drawing them into the community of the already engaged. The communication skills of your leaders are crucial to the development of a social mindset. You want your employees to join your organizational efforts to remain innovative, competitive and successful, instead of joining a union. It’s the path to union proofing your business.

Facebook Live for Employee Communication

How to Use Facebook Live to Connect with Employees

Facebook Live is already being utilized as a powerful marketing tool that connects customers with brands and services. But as people become comfortable with it, more and more businesses are now using the live video streaming service for their internal communications.

Rather than hold extensive meetings that take staff away from their duties, these companies are using Facebook Live to get their message out to employee teams quickly and efficiently.

As most people are comfortable with Facebook already, a Live can be very effective at improving employee relations — particularly in the case of  union organizing activity. Answering questions, dispelling myths and educating employees all take on a additional degree of credibility and honesty when they’re addressed Live.

Using Facebook Live for Employee Engagement

If your employees are engaged and valued, they’re less likely to turn to a union – or any outside, third party – to solve internal issues.

We have some great ways you can  use Facebook Live to maintain healthy and productive relationships with your entire workforce. Throughout, we’ll also provide you with some great tips (that savvy marketers know) that also apply to connecting with employees – starting with the idea of promoting your own online event!

PRO TIP: About a day in advance, let employees know you’ll be hosting the Live. Tease the content without giving it away, and be sure to make them feel like they’re IN on the company’s latest news!

Mid-Level Meetings

Your managers can create intimate impromptu meetings at any time with Facebook Live — regardless of where they or your employees are! This can be an effective way to solicit ideas, deliver positive feedback and quickly update the team on business goals. Remember too that these meetings take on a whole different feel when they’re done as a Live. No more awkward conference calls that drag on for what seems like forever! Employees can post questions in the comments, which can be addressed live or even individually after the broadcast is over.

PRO TIP: Keep it short! Don’t expect employees to stick around forever – keeping your broadcast in the 2-3 minute range is ideal.

Major Announcements

If you’re used to making big company announcements to employees via email, consider the impact of making that announcement live. Make an event of it for employees who are able to be there, and broadcast Live for those who aren’t. Gathering employees together for a Facebook Live broadcast ensures nothing is lost in translation, everyone hears the same message, and it can help improve morale and engagement.

Atlanta-based Jackson Healthcare used Facebook Live in May of last year to share their ground breaking ceremony with employees. They learned that many more employees viewed the Live after it was over than tuned in while it was happening!

PRO TIP: Expand your audience when the news is good – you can use internal company announcements to make customers and the public feel like part of your success story. Facebook will allow you to “boost” your Live post to an audience of your choosing to make an even bigger splash after the event.

Organization Tours

All too often, employees in large companies know nothing of what happens in other departments or locations. By broadcasting tours of various departments and interviewing key personnel, you can give everyone a flavor of what goes on in seemingly remote areas of the business.

PRO TIP: Even if you’re mobile during your live, be sure to use the highest production values possible. Use a gimbal and an external mic, also be sure your internet connection is strong no matter where you’ll be – and of course, be sure your battery is fully charged!

Question and Answer Sessions aka “Ask Me Anything”

People often feel more emboldened to ask awkward questions when there is safety in numbers. You can give your employees an open forum to get their questions answered by holding Q&A sessions via Facebook Live.

Sometimes it’s even more effective to give them the opportunity to submit questions a day (or at most, two) prior to your Live. Allow them to submit via email, suggestion box or anonymous online form. This gives you the opportunity to review the questions and craft your answer, particularly helpful during a union organizing drive!

This format also has the secondary benefit of bringing in a larger audience, as people often want to hear the answer to the question they’ve submitted!

PRO TIP: When you do a Live meeting, have someone assist by manning the comments. That person doesn’t have to be in the same room as you, but they can post relevant links  as well as make sure questions get answered in real-time.

Practical Tips for Employee Communication via Facebook Live

Whether you’re holding a meeting or a Q&A session, there are a few practical tips that should make your next internal Facebook Live broadcast engaging and informative.

Even if you’re not doing a Q&A format, use the hours before your broadcast to gather questions, ideas and discussion topics from your employees. To keep things organized, join companies like Walmart, Dominos and Starbucks by using the new Facebook Workplace app for the entire process.

There are also several other technical tips to bear in mind when communicating with employees via Facebook Live. For example, you should test your lighting levels with other Facebook users in advance. If you’re using your phone’s forward-facing camera, things may be backward! If you’re holding up any documents or demonstrating anything, remember that it’s a mirror image your audience sees. Finally choose a location that is conducive to the type of broadcast you’ll be creating, including external noise, and attractive (and non-distracting) backgrounds.

It’s important to use Facebook Live as an interactive tool. Be ready to respond to comments as and when they’re written, and address commenters by name when you reply.

Delta Air Lines Thanks its Employees via Facebook Live Marathon

The way the world’s largest companies communicate with their employees is changing, and this was demonstrated recently by Delta Air Lines. The company wanted to thank all of its 80,000 employees for a great year, and did so with a 50-hour Facebook Live broadcast.

Marie Osmond, Jeff Foxworthy, Naya Rivera and other celebrities took turns to thank each and every one of Delta’s employees by name. The mammoth broadcast also featured world record attempts, entertainers and coverage of art creation. Delta’s so-called “Big Thank You” was communicated to business partners, customers and employees using the #DeltaProud Twitter hashtag — thus maximizing viewing figures.

Whether you’ve got big news, regular updates, or you’re just keen to keep your organization union-free, communicating with your workforce via Facebook Live can help you to maintain an open, honest and mutually respectful working environment.

11 Examples of How Great Social Media Sets Employers Apart

Forging meaningful connections via social media is a goal of most people. It’s not just individuals though; about 50 percent of large companies and 75 percent of small businesses use social media.

Here are a few examples of how companies excel in using social media:

  1. Best Buy’s Blue Shirt Nation (BSN): This is a community of Best Buy employees who share knowledge, best practices and ideas, regardless of their positions and even ages. Best Buy has successfully integrated this internal network with its employees’ lives and have used it to empower employees and engage them meaningfully.
  2. Zappos: Two-thirds of employees of this online shoe and clothing shop have a social media presence, where they are encouraged to freely connect online with customers. Besides that, the company fosters a culture that helps employees thrive and be happy. You can be sure that no employee of such a company would consider union organizing.
  3. Indium Corporation of America: This solder manufacturer has ten blogs and 15 bloggers. The company has been able to cultivate relationships that enhance not just customer satisfaction and brand loyalty but also employee satisfaction.
  4. Latham & Watkins LLP: The private social network of this large law firm is useful from recruitment to retirement as it contains relevant official and personal content.
  5. Starbucks: Although this popular coffeehouse chain has a social media team, it encourages its employees to share updates about the brand on their own social media accounts. Besides, it has an online community, MyStarbucksIdea, where customers and employees can suggest ideas to improve the Starbucks experience and see it happen. Such employers suck the wind out of the union-organizing sail!
  6. Giantnerd: This company sells equipment for outdoor activities like hiking, biking and snowboarding. They created a social network within their website. You can join it with just one click upon which you will receive a five-percent discount. If you click the Like button on the site or join its Facebook community, you get exclusive deals. Since adding the Like button, Giantnerd’s average order has increased by 50 percent.
  7. San Chez Bistro: This tapas bistro and restaurant uses social media to be in sync with its customers. You can use Twitter to reserve a seat, which is known as “tweet-ahead seating.” Once you tweet, the online hostess tweets back to confirm. They also use their Foursquare page to offer incentives to patrons.
  8. Hootsuite: This popular social media dashboard regularly posts its employees’ photos on Instagram. It tags the employee in the description. Acknowledging and applauding employees improve employee morale and can be a positive union-avoidance method.
  9. Marsh Inc.: When this global risk management and insurance broker wanted to teach finance to a group of employees, it approached its finance experts, who created a 27-part blog series that included both written content and videos taken using phones.
  10. Deloitte: The multinational professional services firm has an internal social network, D Street. Each employee gets a personal landing page at D Street, complete with a photo gallery, an “about me” section and a blog. D Street also has online communities where employees can interact with each other. You can be sure they don’t discuss union card signing there!
  11. Southwest Airlines: This major US airline gets its staff to share stories on its blog, Nuts About Southwest, and post things about the firm on social media. Its social media actions were much appreciated in July 2016, when a technical outage brought the company website and email system down and Southwest’s social media team worked nonstop to respond to frantic queries.

Companies use social media largely to increase brand awareness or as marketing and sales tools. However, it can also be an excellent way to engage your workers meaningfully.

3 Ways to use Google to know what’s REALLY going on at your company

Google for Human ResourcesIn the past, monitoring the reputation of your company was more of a word-of-mouth process. In addition, you could look at your BBB rating, scan the newspapers, and, more recently, run a Google search for the company name. However, none of these actions can give you an accurate picture of how the public and other business owners perceive your company. You need to actively use technology to keep an eye on your business’s reputation. Here are three simple but highly effective strategies you can implement today.

Subscribe to an RSS Feed

Subscribing to an RSS (Rich Site Summary), rather than checking individual websites on your own can save you hours of investigation. First, you will need to choose an RSS Reader such as Newsgator, Amphetadesk and My Yahoo. Then, when you visit a favorite Web page, you can choose the RSS icon. In the future, the site’s content will be delivered to your reader automatically, saving you time and serving as a constant reminder to read pertinent articles about your company.

Set Up Google Alerts

Setting up Google alerts for your company is another simple and effective way to monitor your company’s online presence. Google will send you an email each time the keywords you choose show up in Google content. For instance, you can simply put a name in quotation marks (“Your Business”) and that exact phrase will trigger a Google alert. However, you need to do more than set a Google alert for the company name. You should also set Google alerts for the names of your company’s leaders, top customers, and any products you manufacture.

Unfortunately, websites are hacked daily. Google Alerts can help you guard against unpleasant public fallout if you set certain keywords. You can set up a string of words like “sex” followed by your website name. If improper content shows up on the site, you will be instantly alerted and can take steps to correct the situation.

RELATED: 5 MISTAKES TO AVOID WITH YOUR EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK

Check Glassdoor.com

Glassdoor.com is a website that promotes transparency in the workplace. Employees, current and potential, can sign up for the website to look for jobs, find proper salary ranges, and check employer reviews. If you want to recruit the best employees, staying abreast of your company’s reviews is particularly important.

Employers need to know how their employees perceive them and to take corrective action if company morale is low. You are unlikely to get the full truth by interviewing your own staff, but employees will be blunt when they can voice their opinions anonymously. Remember to check Glassdoor once a week and keep an open mind about what you find there. Truthful feedback is the best way to cultivate positive employee relations.

Take Action Now

When you are union-free, staying abreast of your employees’ feelings is crucial. If you want to be UnionProof, your company must provide a healthy, happy workplace with high employee satisfaction. In addition, you must be fully aware of public perception of your company to stay competitive. Monitoring your company’s online reputation protects the business and employees by enabling you to adjust your practices and do damage control by advancing good press relations.

Your human resources department can save the company much grief by being alert to the online content out there, both positive and negative. These simple actions can give you the information you need to protect your company’s online presence and stay ahead of  both competitors and union organizers.

Boosting Your Employer Brand Through Social Media: 4 Great Tips

Employer Branding RecruitmentHow do companies get a reputation for being a great place to work? In the past, it was all word of mouth. Employees would share stories with their friends, and your company slowly would build a reputation. Hopefully, a positive one.

These days, it’s possible to manage your own brand as an employer, and social media can be the driving force behind it. But how does a company leverage social media to demonstrate that it’s an attractive place to work? Here are a few things to consider:

1. Build Engagement By Offering Great Content

If you have an account that just posts details of vacancies, you will only attract job-seekers. If you post content that’s interesting, informative and entertaining, you will attract everybody. This is the real aim of employer branding: to build a positive reputation on a large scale and to passively recruit people who may not be actively seeking a job. Video is an excellent way to catch the attention of passersby on social media, as are catchy viral articles. If you create something great, people will share it, increasing your reach by orders of magnitude.

2. Get the Experts Involved (Your Employees)

Who knows more about your values as an employer than the people who work for you? They can provide you with stories, anecdotes, photos, cases studies and details of the social side of working life in your organization. They can help you give your company a personality, which is a key element of all branding. Talk to your people about your social media plans and see how they can help.

3. Celebrate Your Values

Social media places a huge emphasis on authenticity. To build a successful employer brand on social media, you have to talk honestly about who you are, where you’re going and how you intend to get there. Most of all, you need to talk about the values at the core of your company. Never try to advertise yourself as something you’re not. Instead, be proud of what your company stands for and let the world know about it.

employee engagement

4. Have Real Conversations With People

Social media is not a broadcast. It is two-way conversation. Everything you post is an opportunity to start a dialogue, which shows that you are responsive, dynamic and approachable. It’s also important on a one-to-one level in terms of passive recruitment, as even minor conversations can help to form a relationship that may lead to that person applying for a job.

It can take time and effort to build an effective employer brand on social media, but can you afford to leave it to word of mouth?

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