Category Archives for Corporate Social Media

Twitter for HR

To Tweet or Not To Tweet: Twitter for HR Pros

Twitter for HR. Seems like something we should have already conquered, but the truth is, knowing exactly which 280 characters will attract the best talent to our organizations is a tall order.

Today’s job seeker can afford to be highly selective. Those with exceptional skills are often looking for a new position while continuing in their current one. With risk low, job candidates can take the time to research any company they’re considering thoroughly – and yes, that includes following the Company on social media.

More than70% of employers now use social media as a research resource to find out more information about job candidates, and at least 62% of millennials visit company social media sites to look for job openings. Twitter, in particular, can be useful when disseminating information and generating awareness about open positions. However, at the same time, it can also be challenging to use Twitter for HR the right way.

These Twitter for HR tips will ensure you use social media in a way that helps build your brand and establish your Company as an employer of choice:

Tweet about Job Openings

The most straightforward way you can use Twitter for HR is to tweet job openings. Create a unique hashtag (e.g., #companyhiring), then make sure you include it with all job openings. Use relevant global hashtags that will draw in job seekers who aren’t already familiar with your company. Include #JobListing, #JobOpening or hashtags about your geographic area or industry. Hashtags about your jobs will help attract people who are using Twitter to look for open positions.

Use the #HireFriday Feed

#HireFriday is a popular Twitter feed that job seekers often follow. Tweet on Fridays with the hashtag #HireFriday to help your open positions get more exposure at the end of each week.

Stick to Your Brand Identity

To truly have a reputation as an employer of choice, always maintain your company’s voice and tone. Include Tweets that reflect the company’s vision, mission, and values. (In fact, those make great tweets all by themselves!) Make sure that your Twitter account helps to solidify your brand image–not detract from it. When in doubt, reflect on the company’s stated values.

Avoid Controversy When Using Twitter for HR

Actively avoid questionable activity on Twitter. Having a cautionary mindset means you should avoid engaging in anything political or religious (including following public figures, liking or retweeting polarizing posts, and posting anything controversial yourself). Keep Tweets strictly about your company to ensure you don’t alienate outstanding job candidates.

With the proliferation of technology today, HR professionals have a bounty of resources at their fingertips that can help them recruit and reach the best candidates for open positions. One of them is Twitter. By understanding how to use the platform and what pitfalls you can avoid, you can ensure that using Twitter for HR will help you do your job more effectively and efficiently and that you reach just the right audience.

Attract talented employees

3 Reasons You Should Be Using Social Media for Recruiting

With all of the online options available to job seekers today, human resources departments have to be strategic when posting available positions. Recruiters often think to look for candidates on employment sites, their own company websites and even local community job boards, and up to 70% of recruiters are now utilizing social media. So why should you use social media for recruiting? Social media offers three clear benefits that  job posting websites do not.

1. Social Media for Recruiting Is Cost-Effective

Unlike many job posting sites, the cost for social media can be very minimal. Campaigns can be set up per impression or per click (also known as Pay-Per-Click advertising). Facebook and LinkedIn offer date-bound options so you can end the campaign at a particular day and time. Both platforms also allow advertisers to set a total budget the platforms algorithms distribute the campaign funds over the lifetime of the campaign. This works well if you have a small team that cannot monitor the campaign every day.

Social Media for recruiting

2. Social Media for Recruiting Allows You To Target Your Audience

Social media also offers the benefit of creating specific, targeted audiences. Facebook and LinkedIn both allow advertisers to create custom audiences based on a wide variety of demographics, from identifying people near your chosen location to current job titles, education, and salary. This provides the opportunity for recruiters to zero in on the most qualified talent for the position. A word of caution here, though: the ultra-specific audience targeting available through these social media sites may limit the number and type of candidates you see. Remember to broaden your scope as needed to ensure you consider a well-rounded applicant pool.

3. Social Media for Recruiting Gives You The Power To Track Conversions

The final reason social media should be used as part of every human resources recruitment strategy  is the ability to easily track conversions and see measurable results. Knowing how well your advertising worked is important to help justify the dollars that are spent on recruitment efforts. On social media, you can view your campaign’s performance and evaluate how many people have seen your ad, interacted with your ad, and even clicked over to the job description or application page. There are a variety of parameters you can choose from for tracking conversions. Your definition of “conversion” can be set as a website click through, interacting with your ad, or even just as simply as how many people saw the ad. So, your conversion can be customized based on how your department wants to analyze results and define success.

Are your leaders utilizing social media as well? Social media can be a powerful internal tool, that improves engagement and brings outstanding candidates to your door. Make sure your leaders are trained in the soft skills and people skills that create an environment where employees thrive and unions aren’t necessary.

Remember too that your recruitment efforts can be influenced by your overall employer brand online. When you take the time to produce video about what it’s like to work for your company, post regularly about your positive employee relations, or dig in to your LinkedIn Company and LinkedIn Career pages, it speaks volumes about the pride people feel in working there. When you’re ready to launch your social media recruiting strategy, be sure to consider all the factors, including where your ideal client spends time on line, and which platforms appeal to the ideal candidate for your available positions.

Social media for recruiting

social media employees

Why Great Social Media Video is Gold for Your Employees

Social media is no longer optional if you want to engage your employees and build your employer brand. Mobile devices are a primary source of information and communication for most Americans, and platforms like Facebook and Twitter are central to the mobile lifestyle. In short, if you aren’t on social media and you don’t have great social media video, your message isn’t being heard – and that inhibits your ability to attract top talent and retain your most highly-qualified workers.

Adding Social Media Video to Your Media Mix

While it is possible to connect with employees through text-based posts and long-form content, research shows that the most effective way to capture the attention of your audience is through images. When those images are delivered in the form of short, creative videos, you can count on a positive response. One study demonstrated that four times as many consumers would prefer to watch a video about a product than to read about it – and that preference extends to receiving all sorts of information, including your employer branding messages.

RELATED: Why Your Employer Brand Matters

Perhaps the most important reason to communicate through social media video is the retention factor. Your employees are 65 percent more likely to remember your content after three days when it is presented in a visual format versus a text-based format. That means more time to consider your message and share it with colleagues, extending your reach dramatically.

Consider the benefits of a strong social media presence. Creative, engaging employer branding encourages job-seekers to become applicants, and it keeps current staff members connected with the company. Employers have successfully leveraged social media video to communicate with current and prospective employees about benefits, company culture, and social responsibility. Some even use this forum to encourage strong connections between management and the workforce, effectively discouraging unions from their attempts to stir discontent.

Stories, Tweets, and Channels – Differentiating Your Social Media Strategy Across Platforms

While it is possible to use the same social media video content across multiple platforms, your social media campaigns should include slightly different strategies for each of the popular sites. Differentiate your content based on the culture promoted by individual channels. These are the basics for today’s top social media platforms:

  • Facebook – This is the first place most of your employees will look for you, so make sure your page is entertaining. This is your opportunity to get a little more casual, sharing images and videos you want to go viral.
  • Social Media Leaders – Microsoft knows how to make the most of Facebook, with two major pages. Check out Microsoft Life and Women of Microsoft.
  • LinkedIn – This site is primarily geared towards job seekers, so it is an important place to build your employer brand. The tone is more formal on LinkedIn than on other social media platforms.
  • Social Media LeadersGeneral Mills leverages LinkedIn’s video capabilities to connect with job seekers.
  • YouTube – It’s all about video on YouTube. Using text to share your message simply isn’t an option. This is a great opportunity to start up a channel and create video content that illustrates a-day-in-the-life at your company. Use this platform to house your video, then connect to it through your other social media pages.
  • Social Media LeadersPenn National Gaming’s YouTube Channel is a great example of high-quality video branding.
  • Twitter – Micro-blogging means you have to make your point quickly if you choose a written format. Fortunately, you don’t have to limit the number of characters in your videos. Use this platform to link followers to your content through your tweets.
  • Social Media Leaders – Zappos uses a dedicated Inside Zappos Twitter Page to connect with current and prospective employees.

Getting started on social media doesn’t have to be complicated. Start with Facebook, then expand to other popular platforms. For more information on connecting with your employees through innovative, engaging social media videos, visit Projections, Inc.

Gen Z Employees

They’re Here! Time to Recognize Gen Z Employees

Introducing the new workforce: Gen Z (aka iGeneration)! By the year 2020, this youngest generation of workers, Gen Z employees, will account for 20 percent of the workforce. Born during or after 1995, the eldest are 23 years old and are already working side-by-side with four other generations: millennials (Gen Y), Gen X, baby boomers and the silent generation. The oldest millennials are 38 years old, so Gen Z has multigenerational leaders, challenging your organization to develop effective and productive communication systems, leadership skills, and training and development programs.

Every generation has different perspectives about employment and careers, so it’s time for you to dive into understanding Gen Z employees in order to maintain successful HR practices that engage the whole workforce.

What Is Gen Z Thinking?

Just when you’ve finally learned how to successfully engage millennials, along comes Gen Z. As the first digital-native generation, millennials have driven significant changes in the workplace, from workplace design to embracing social responsibility. Gen Z employees are entering the workforce as employees who are even more comfortable with technology, but their perspective on and experience with technology tools are much different from earlier generations.

A Deloitte study created an informative picture of these young people. Gen Z is skilled with technology. Unlike millennials, they grew up moving rapidly across a variety of technologies — smartphones, tablets and laptops — and social media programs – Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook, etc. They are entering their careers at higher levels as most “typical” entry-level work is now automated.

Gen Z is very concerned about their ability to communicate and forge strong interpersonal relationships. This may be due to the fact that technology has negatively impacted their cognitive skill development, and they recognize that their social skills, like critical thinking and communication, are weak.

Attract Talented Employees

Small Bites at a Time

Gen Z absorbs information in small bites and is visually oriented. This has implications for your training and communication systems. Learning programs that deliver information in easily digested, intuitive modules are attractive to Gen Z employees. Adding soft skills development, such as problem-solving and leadership skills, to training and development can close technology-created gaps in communication skills. This begins with your onboarding program, which should initiate the education process for developing cognitive and communication skills — and continue through all your training programs.

You should use mixed training media that is visually stimulating, easy to access and use, flexible and available 24/7. Providing mobile access is critical to successful Gen Z training, and enables you to deliver continuous learning opportunities. Your managers will also need to hold in-person meetings to supplement the technology-based training and encourage Gen Zers to collaborate on designing work environments that enable people to work as teams, in person or through collaborative technologies.

Gen Z employees also value diversity and are attracted to employers who have similar values and will provide learning and experiential opportunities to work with people who have diverse backgrounds, origins and preferences. In this regard, they are quite similar to younger millennials. The Ernst & Young survey of Gen Z interns found that they prefer millennial managers over Gen X or Baby Boomer managers, likely because some of their perspectives intersect. Since it’s estimated that millennials and Gen Z employees will make up approximately 75 percent of the workforce by the year 2025, this will become a fact of life anyway.

Creating a Generational Bond

Your leaders need skills that enable them to create a cohesive, collaborative workforce within the context of a culture that embraces diversity and innovation. Could anything seem more challenging from an HR perspective?

Managing and motivating a four- or even five-generation workforce that is growing younger and older at the same time requires leaders who can build respect and trust among them. With top-down support, it’s the front-line leaders who maintain a positive corporate culture and engage employees. You want to develop leaders who can identify and promote shared values across the generations, creating a bond. A good leader is accessible, helps each employee understand the importance of their role, holds people accountable, challenges employees to perform at their highest level and meets their unique needs. An effective leader understands generational differences and leverages that knowledge to engage employees.

For example, baby boomers prefer face-to-face communication and Gen Z needs to develop interpersonal communication skills. Millennials and Gen Z are deeply interested in working for organizations that are socially responsible. Millennials use social media to collaborate. Gen Z employees are natural collaborators and use social media to facilitate real world connections. Both baby boomers and Gen Z desire face-to-face meeting opportunities.

Fact of Life

Do your leaders develop mixed-age collaborative teams? Are younger and older workers given opportunities to interact with knowledge sharing from both directions? Do your managers know how to leverage the differing generational motivations to engage all employees? Do your leaders understand the importance of personalized communication skills? Do they have inclusive skills that strengthen employee engagement among all employee generations? These are the kinds of questions you should be asking about your organization’s leadership skills now to develop positive employee relations in a multigenerational workforce.

Finding common ground to bring people together based on their preferences and needs in a productive manner promotes cohesiveness and creates a foundation for leading a multigenerational team. You can develop customized employee videos, web training and eLearning programs that deliver information in a desired format and leadership training programs that address connecting with and managing a multigenerational workforce.

A multigenerational workforce will be a fact of life for decades to come. Consider this: In 16 years, the oldest of Gen Alpha, the next generation, will be 21 years old and entering the workforce. Learning how to connect with a multigenerational workforce now will prepare your organization to engage all employees well into the future.

The Social Side of Employee Communication

Employee engagement is a persistent problem for organizations around the world for many reasons. They include increasing use of remote workers, technology that makes interpersonal communication less personal, generational differences in work expectations and communication styles, the inability to clearly separate work and personal lives, poor leadership skills and employees feeling undervalued.

The Social Mindset Is a Bond

Engagement exists when empowered employees feel connected to their work and the organization, but each person in your organization experiences engagement in a different way. For this reason, developing high engagement levels begins with developing an organizational “social mindset” in which a sense of community is created. Unions have mastered this concept, making their members feel like they’re in an exclusive club with leaders who really listen, and will champion their causes and go to bat for them when issues arise. Unions regularly communicate with their members, using social media tools and personal meetings, to keep the connection strong and inspire feelings of empowerment. The union social mindset is a bond that unites everyone around a common cause.

Social factors are important to all employees but especially to millennials. They’re always connected via social media, but social media by itself isn’t guaranteed to engage people or promote optimal communication. Too many employers miss the link between a social mindset and engagement. Social media is an engagement tool, but if your organization doesn’t develop a social mindset, your employees won’t utilize the social tools to their greatest advantage. Your employees’ behaviors are indicative of a lack of social mindset. For example, low utilization of an enterprise-wide social media system or lack of response to a manager’s feedback on a project in progress or failure to participate on coworker teams, are a few indications that your employees don’t view themselves as important contributors to a cohesive team of workers.

An organization with a social mindset focuses on its people and is key to creating a culture of inclusion in which people thrive. Creating an organization with a social mindset requires giving people the right tools, but the tools must empower people to learn what they need and want to learn to achieve the highest performance level and to learn when they want to learn. It must be a collaborative learning journey in which people learn from each other, and have access to on-demand learning and access to internal and external communities that enable continuous learning. A social mindset means employees utilize all online and offline social systems to autonomously manage their jobs with a clear understanding of how their work contributes to organizational goals. They see themselves as proactive team members doing important work.

Self-Empowerment

Engagement actually emanates from the ability of employees to self-empower. Your organization is unique from all others. It’s why you’ve achieved competitive success. The uniqueness drives the need for the development of an internal communication system that specifically resonates with your employees. The communication system consists of tools that are available to the entire workforce; consistent, tailored messaging; regular management feedback; and leaders with effective communication skills. Engaging your workforce in a meaningful way also requires providing content that adds value to their work and is easily understood.

Millennials prefer information delivered quickly and with visual aids, and user-friendly communication platforms that include video, web, and eLearning communication tools. Of course, mobile platforms are a necessity in the eyes of your younger employees. This creates the seamless communication system that accommodates the ‘where and when’ learning and communication needs. Engaging employees requires you to encourage all people to participate in the business, including remote workers, and to provide opportunities for improving processes. Meetings can encourage people to ask questions rather than expecting people to passively learn the material. Technology-based training programs are interactive. Leader feedback encourages stretch thinking. This is how you develop a social learning organization.

Self-Motivated and Committed Employees

Various researchers have determined that employee engagement recognizes an employee’s psychological state, behaviors, and linkages between engagement and employee satisfaction. Satisfaction is not enough though. Engaged employees are committed to the organization’s mission, self-motivated and passionate about their work. Your organization’s communication system is an essential element in the engagement process, but only if it stimulates constructive conversations and positive behaviors.

Southwest Airlines is an example of a company that has created a social mindset. Employees are encouraged to collaborate, participate in decision-making and explore work activities outside their regular jobs. Employees across the organization were encouraged to share new ideas for uniforms, and one of the flight attendants chosen to participate on a final design committee called it an “unforgettable experience.” Southwest Airlines considers social media as a means for relationship building with and between employees and customers because it gives the company the ability to connect people across teams and cultures.

Airbnb creates an employee experience which considers physical, emotional, aspirational, intellectual and virtual (collaborative technologies) aspects. The collaborative technologies are used to communicate the company culture and hold an online live-streamed weekly meeting, and employees are encouraged to use WhatsApp to share learning, photos, and insights. This enables the company to create a social mindset by opening communication up to all employees around the world.

An Organizing Model for Employers

Previously a labor organizer, author Jane McAlevey shared her experiences and perspectives on union organizing in “Raising Expectations (and Raising Hell)” and proposed a union-building operational model in “No Shortcuts: Organizing for Power in the New Gilded Age.” She points out that mobilizing may bring large numbers of people into the battle for employee rights but these are people already committed. To build a strong union, its leaders must expand its base to include ordinary people who were never involved in organizing. They do this by helping ordinary people understand they hold the power and can achieve desired outcomes.

Her basic operating model has several major elements that include: deep organizing in which indifferent people are attracted; full-worker organizing in which all working people are made to understand they are members of a community and have untapped potential; building unity across classes of people; developing organic leaders who create a social force capable of exercising power; and tracking every worker’s participation in the workplace and the community to better engage them in the union learning and development processes.

Creating the Social Context

McAlevey’s model is an engagement model. As an employer, you must understand an engaging communication system in your organization makes it possible for all employees to participate, exercise their power to contribute to organizational success and create a social force. The social mindset encourages people to fully participate in the communication process by providing context.

It’s not a passive system. It proactively embraces the disengaged, drawing them into the community of the already engaged. The communication skills of your leaders are crucial to the development of a social mindset. You want your employees to join your organizational efforts to remain innovative, competitive and successful, instead of joining a union. It’s the path to union proofing your business.

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