Category Archives for Corporate Communication

Twitter for HR

To Tweet or Not To Tweet: Twitter for HR Pros

Twitter for HR. Seems like something we should have already conquered, but the truth is, knowing exactly which 280 characters will attract the best talent to our organizations is a tall order.

Today’s job seeker can afford to be highly selective. Those with exceptional skills are often looking for a new position while continuing in their current one. With risk low, job candidates can take the time to research any company they’re considering thoroughly – and yes, that includes following the Company on social media.

More than70% of employers now use social media as a research resource to find out more information about job candidates, and at least 62% of millennials visit company social media sites to look for job openings. Twitter, in particular, can be useful when disseminating information and generating awareness about open positions. However, at the same time, it can also be challenging to use Twitter for HR the right way.

These Twitter for HR tips will ensure you use social media in a way that helps build your brand and establish your Company as an employer of choice:

Tweet about Job Openings

The most straightforward way you can use Twitter for HR is to tweet job openings. Create a unique hashtag (e.g., #companyhiring), then make sure you include it with all job openings. Use relevant global hashtags that will draw in job seekers who aren’t already familiar with your company. Include #JobListing, #JobOpening or hashtags about your geographic area or industry. Hashtags about your jobs will help attract people who are using Twitter to look for open positions.

Use the #HireFriday Feed

#HireFriday is a popular Twitter feed that job seekers often follow. Tweet on Fridays with the hashtag #HireFriday to help your open positions get more exposure at the end of each week.

Stick to Your Brand Identity

To truly have a reputation as an employer of choice, always maintain your company’s voice and tone. Include Tweets that reflect the company’s vision, mission, and values. (In fact, those make great tweets all by themselves!) Make sure that your Twitter account helps to solidify your brand image–not detract from it. When in doubt, reflect on the company’s stated values.

Avoid Controversy When Using Twitter for HR

Actively avoid questionable activity on Twitter. Having a cautionary mindset means you should avoid engaging in anything political or religious (including following public figures, liking or retweeting polarizing posts, and posting anything controversial yourself). Keep Tweets strictly about your company to ensure you don’t alienate outstanding job candidates.

With the proliferation of technology today, HR professionals have a bounty of resources at their fingertips that can help them recruit and reach the best candidates for open positions. One of them is Twitter. By understanding how to use the platform and what pitfalls you can avoid, you can ensure that using Twitter for HR will help you do your job more effectively and efficiently and that you reach just the right audience.

Attract talented employees

Corporate Collective Consciousness

Can you guess the movie from these famous quotes?

“Toto, I’ve got a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore.”

“May the Force be with you.”

“Here’s looking at you, kid.”

Chances are, you guessed all three. These quotes have become part of our collective consciousness. Nearly everybody recognizes them, even if they’ve never seen the original movie.

Does your company have a good corporate culture and collective consciousness, too? Everyone in your organization should share the same values, attitudes, and ideas. Everyone should be reading from the same page. But it doesn’t always work like this. What gives?

RELATED: Union Organizing Why Your Employer Brand Matters

Things Your Employees Inherently Know

There are things that every one of your employees inherently knows. They know what time they start work, what time they finish, where the vending machines are.

But do your employees know about your company mission and corporate culture? Your long-term strategic goals? Your morals, values, and beliefs?

Probably not. At least, most of them don’t. In fact, 61 percent of employees are completely unaware of their company’s mission statement. The majority of those who do (57 percent) say they feel uninspired by it.

The problem is, most employee orientation programs just aren’t good enough. They introduce employees to their new role but don’t focus on company culture and long-term development.

It’s no wonder, then, that most of your staff have no clue about your company’s values, ethics and corporate culture.

How to Improve Collective Consciousness

Want to improve your company’s collective consciousness? You need to engage with your employees, from their first interview to their final day in the office. Here’s how:

Make the Message Loud and Clear for Good Corporate Culture

If your employees are unaware of your mission statement, you probably aren’t communicating it clearly enough. List your goals and values on your website, on your social media pages, and in your employee orientation literature.

Be More Transparent

Business transparency is crucial for employee engagement. Your manager should be visible and friendly; your HR team should be approachable and willing to answer questions from your employees.

RELATED: Leading With Transparency and Empathy

Use the Latest Technology

The latest technology will help you communicate your message and improve collective consciousness. Employee orientation videos, for example, enhance the onboarding process, improve employee conduct and manage expectations. Your new hires are more likely to remember the information you’re telling them, too — 65 percent of people are visual learners.

Follow the tips on this list, and your company’s values, ethics, and goals will soon be as recognizable as all those famous movies quotes that everyone can roll off their tongue.

employee communication and digital marketing

Shouting into the Void: Employee Communication and Digital Marketing

There are 287 million internet users in the United States. It’s safe to say, then, that most people, if not everyone, in your organization use the internet on a regular basis. As your employees spend more of their time online, you have more opportunities for engagement. Now you can use the same techniques digital marketers use to build your company culture, connect with workers and promote positive employee relations. But how you do it? Here are several ways to connect employee communication and digital marketing

Why Should You Communicate With Employees Online?

As an HR and labor relation pro, you know the drill. Sometimes communicating with employees is a challenge — you feel like no one’s listening. You probably get questions from workers that you’ve already answered. Did these employees just forget what you told them? Or were they even listening in the first place?
Consider thinking of your employee communications like digital marketing. This approach allows you to get your message across in an innovative way. Workers are more likely to retain important info, and you can foster positive employee relations. Digital marketing is a powerful tool that lets you engage with workers in your organization. It’s “an umbrella term for all your online marketing efforts,” says software development and marketing company, HubSpot. This term encompasses methods like Google search, email, websites, online video and social media.

How Can You Use Digital Marketing to Engage Employees?

HR pros are using digital marketing techniques today to target employees and create a UnionProof culture. One type of digital marketing method, email automation, for example, lets you send automated marketing messages to staff about relevant and timely topics. Automation can also be a powerful tool for onboarding new employees, with just the right amount of information delivered at just the right time. Automated emails can include links to video messaging, downloadable resources, company handbook, and more. Later, you can also educate employees on right-to-work laws, authorization cards, dues and other information specific to your UnionProof culture. You can communicate your union-free philosophy and inspire workers to take specific actions.
Another aspect of digital marketing, social media, can help you build your culture of engagement by featuring positive employee relations stories from inside the company. Create your online presence as an employer of choice with benefits for new hires, a new hire orientation video, and current industry and legal updates that resonate with employees at your company.
Unlike traditional advertising, digital marketing lets you track your communications with employees. Discover, for example, whether staff read your emails or liked your social media posts. “Digital analytics play a crucial role in nearly every enterprise’s digital marketing strategy, not only for tracking and measuring website traffic but for tracking and measuring other digital channels, as well,” says Marketing Land. “With the explosive growth of social media, video, and mobile, the importance of understanding the contributions and relationships of these channels to website traffic and conversions has increased significantly.”
social media monitoring

Traditional vs. Digital Marketing

In the past, HR teams sent employees paper-based communications like newsletters. These took a long time to complete, and there were no guarantees that employees would even read them. Digital marketing methods, on the other hand, increase the likelihood of staff reading your messages. Research shows that the average person checks his or her email 15 times and spends 35 minutes on Facebook every single day.
Therefore, digital marketing is a great way to promote labor relations. You can update your Instagram and Twitter feeds with the latest developments in union avoidance, for example, or attract more people to your organization with search engine optimization (SEO).

What Are the Best Digital Marketing Techniques?

You can incorporate various methods into your digital marketing strategy. Here are some techniques that you can use.
  • Promote your company’s objectives and values on social media with the right hashtags. Who knows, someone with hundreds of thousands of followers might see your message and post it on their page.
  • Advertise events that promote union-free workplaces on your website or blog. It’s just like pinning an ad on your office noticeboard, but employees are more likely to take notice of your message. Encourage your social media followers to like, share and comment on your content, too.
  • Use pay-per-click advertising to increase the number of people who visit your website and blog. This type of search engine marketing increases the visibility of your organization and its core values on websites like Google and Bing.

What Else?

There are other digital marketing methods, too. Content marketing, for example, lets you incorporate information about your company and its union-free philosophy on your blog. You can create compelling content — what it’s like to work for your company, for example — and post information about employee orientation and staff training.
Text messaging lets you send short marketing messages to mobile devices — perfect if you need to notify employees quickly. This is an effective communication tool: Collectively, Americans check their phones 8 billion times per day.
Live online events are just as effective. Webinars, for example, let you communicate union-free practices and HR-related topics to audiences around the world. All you need is a computer or mobile and an internet connection.
Finally, online video is a powerful tool for employee communications. Use it for orientation and training.
Still haven’t incorporated digital marketing into your workplace? Using marketing methods like SEO, social media, email automation, live events and video promotes your company culture, improves communications and lets you engage with employees on a much deeper level.
social media video
Increase Employee Engagement

Increase Employee Engagement With These 3 Easy Tips

According to a recent Gallup poll, companies with a high rate of engaged employees rates are 21 percent more productive.

So, that leads us to the idea that having employees who are happy and committed to their work is an essential part of your company’s long-term success. Working to increase employee engagement can help to decrease turnover costs while boosting efficiency and productivity.

Now that we’ve made the case for paying attention to engagement, it’s also vital to mention that a failure to focus on what your employees need will put your company in a compromised position, far more so than any competitor or shift in the market.

We’ve got some quick, actionable tips for improving employee engagement that are by no means a cure-all, but still an excellent starting place! (Read through to the end for some ideas on taking your employee engagement efforts to the next level.)

1. Increase Employee Engagement by Increasing Your Team’s Confidence in Leadership

A Darwin Survey performed a few years ago found that the most important factor in employee loyalty and engagement was confidence in leadership.

Employees want to feel like they are being managed by someone who has vision and experience. The best way to make yourself a better leader is by striving to improve your skill set and industry knowledge.

Some leaders try rest on their laurels, which can lead to big problems. Continuing your education and staying up-to-date on developments within your industry can make your company stronger and your engaged employees more productive.

Your employee engagement efforts

2. Increase Employee Engagement By Working to Improve Company Culture

In short, your company’s culture is a combination of how you interact with your employees and how they interact with each other.

Your job as a leader is to keep your finger on the pulse of your company’s culture. When you have to address interpersonal problems within your company, avoid “meddling” in the personal affairs of your employees. Being completely objective and professional can help you avoid showing favoritism when issues like this arise while you are trying to create engaged employees.

Remember that a solid culture is built on trust and consistency, and that providing your leaders – those who interact with employees daily – with ongoing training can inspire the exact kind of engagement you’re looking for.

And on that note…

3. Increase Employee Engagement By Providing Adequate Training and Equipment

One of the most common sources of employee frustration is a lack of training. This is crucial in the early days of employment, and a well-thought out onboarding process is a large part of future engagement.

If an employee feels like they have not been given the knowledge or tools needed to do their job correctly, they will start to seek other employment opportunities. In fact, the Work Institute reported that 34% of turnover occurred in the first year of employment.

Focus on providing ongoing training to create engaged employees. Vary the medium to engage today’s employees, and take advantage of online video and highly interactive eLearning. Custom solutions are often the best choice when you want to create greater employee engagement while building your company’s best culture.

Next-level engagement solutions for your company may incorporate social media, dedicated websites, shareable content and video, and even continuous feedback loop solutions such as warble and 15five.

Looking for ways to connect with your employees? The team at Projections offers custom video, websites and eLearning, specifically crafted to engage and inspire employees! For over 40 years, Projections has helped employers just like you keep their teams engaged and productive, helping companies create a UnionProof culture from day one, and a reputation as an employer of choice!

Gen Z Employees

They’re Here! Time to Recognize Gen Z Employees

Introducing the new workforce: Gen Z (aka iGeneration)! By the year 2020, this youngest generation of workers, Gen Z employees, will account for 20 percent of the workforce. Born during or after 1995, the eldest are 23 years old and are already working side-by-side with four other generations: millennials (Gen Y), Gen X, baby boomers and the silent generation. The oldest millennials are 38 years old, so Gen Z has multigenerational leaders, challenging your organization to develop effective and productive communication systems, leadership skills, and training and development programs.

Every generation has different perspectives about employment and careers, so it’s time for you to dive into understanding Gen Z employees in order to maintain successful HR practices that engage the whole workforce.

What Is Gen Z Thinking?

Just when you’ve finally learned how to successfully engage millennials, along comes Gen Z. As the first digital-native generation, millennials have driven significant changes in the workplace, from workplace design to embracing social responsibility. Gen Z employees are entering the workforce as employees who are even more comfortable with technology, but their perspective on and experience with technology tools are much different from earlier generations.

A Deloitte study created an informative picture of these young people. Gen Z is skilled with technology. Unlike millennials, they grew up moving rapidly across a variety of technologies — smartphones, tablets and laptops — and social media programs – Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook, etc. They are entering their careers at higher levels as most “typical” entry-level work is now automated.

Gen Z is very concerned about their ability to communicate and forge strong interpersonal relationships. This may be due to the fact that technology has negatively impacted their cognitive skill development, and they recognize that their social skills, like critical thinking and communication, are weak.

Attract Talented Employees

Small Bites at a Time

Gen Z absorbs information in small bites and is visually oriented. This has implications for your training and communication systems. Learning programs that deliver information in easily digested, intuitive modules are attractive to Gen Z employees. Adding soft skills development, such as problem-solving and leadership skills, to training and development can close technology-created gaps in communication skills. This begins with your onboarding program, which should initiate the education process for developing cognitive and communication skills — and continue through all your training programs.

You should use mixed training media that is visually stimulating, easy to access and use, flexible and available 24/7. Providing mobile access is critical to successful Gen Z training, and enables you to deliver continuous learning opportunities. Your managers will also need to hold in-person meetings to supplement the technology-based training and encourage Gen Zers to collaborate on designing work environments that enable people to work as teams, in person or through collaborative technologies.

Gen Z employees also value diversity and are attracted to employers who have similar values and will provide learning and experiential opportunities to work with people who have diverse backgrounds, origins and preferences. In this regard, they are quite similar to younger millennials. The Ernst & Young survey of Gen Z interns found that they prefer millennial managers over Gen X or Baby Boomer managers, likely because some of their perspectives intersect. Since it’s estimated that millennials and Gen Z employees will make up approximately 75 percent of the workforce by the year 2025, this will become a fact of life anyway.

Creating a Generational Bond

Your leaders need skills that enable them to create a cohesive, collaborative workforce within the context of a culture that embraces diversity and innovation. Could anything seem more challenging from an HR perspective?

Managing and motivating a four- or even five-generation workforce that is growing younger and older at the same time requires leaders who can build respect and trust among them. With top-down support, it’s the front-line leaders who maintain a positive corporate culture and engage employees. You want to develop leaders who can identify and promote shared values across the generations, creating a bond. A good leader is accessible, helps each employee understand the importance of their role, holds people accountable, challenges employees to perform at their highest level and meets their unique needs. An effective leader understands generational differences and leverages that knowledge to engage employees.

For example, baby boomers prefer face-to-face communication and Gen Z needs to develop interpersonal communication skills. Millennials and Gen Z are deeply interested in working for organizations that are socially responsible. Millennials use social media to collaborate. Gen Z employees are natural collaborators and use social media to facilitate real world connections. Both baby boomers and Gen Z desire face-to-face meeting opportunities.

Fact of Life

Do your leaders develop mixed-age collaborative teams? Are younger and older workers given opportunities to interact with knowledge sharing from both directions? Do your managers know how to leverage the differing generational motivations to engage all employees? Do your leaders understand the importance of personalized communication skills? Do they have inclusive skills that strengthen employee engagement among all employee generations? These are the kinds of questions you should be asking about your organization’s leadership skills now to develop positive employee relations in a multigenerational workforce.

Finding common ground to bring people together based on their preferences and needs in a productive manner promotes cohesiveness and creates a foundation for leading a multigenerational team. You can develop customized employee videos, web training and eLearning programs that deliver information in a desired format and leadership training programs that address connecting with and managing a multigenerational workforce.

A multigenerational workforce will be a fact of life for decades to come. Consider this: In 16 years, the oldest of Gen Alpha, the next generation, will be 21 years old and entering the workforce. Learning how to connect with a multigenerational workforce now will prepare your organization to engage all employees well into the future.

1 2 3 7