Category Archives for Best Business Practices

Twitter for HR

To Tweet or Not To Tweet: Twitter for HR Pros

Twitter for HR. Seems like something we should have already conquered, but the truth is, knowing exactly which 280 characters will attract the best talent to our organizations is a tall order.

Today’s job seeker can afford to be highly selective. Those with exceptional skills are often looking for a new position while continuing in their current one. With risk low, job candidates can take the time to research any company they’re considering thoroughly – and yes, that includes following the Company on social media.

More than70% of employers now use social media as a research resource to find out more information about job candidates, and at least 62% of millennials visit company social media sites to look for job openings. Twitter, in particular, can be useful when disseminating information and generating awareness about open positions. However, at the same time, it can also be challenging to use Twitter for HR the right way.

These Twitter for HR tips will ensure you use social media in a way that helps build your brand and establish your Company as an employer of choice:

Tweet about Job Openings

The most straightforward way you can use Twitter for HR is to tweet job openings. Create a unique hashtag (e.g., #companyhiring), then make sure you include it with all job openings. Use relevant global hashtags that will draw in job seekers who aren’t already familiar with your company. Include #JobListing, #JobOpening or hashtags about your geographic area or industry. Hashtags about your jobs will help attract people who are using Twitter to look for open positions.

Use the #HireFriday Feed

#HireFriday is a popular Twitter feed that job seekers often follow. Tweet on Fridays with the hashtag #HireFriday to help your open positions get more exposure at the end of each week.

Stick to Your Brand Identity

To truly have a reputation as an employer of choice, always maintain your company’s voice and tone. Include Tweets that reflect the company’s vision, mission, and values. (In fact, those make great tweets all by themselves!) Make sure that your Twitter account helps to solidify your brand image–not detract from it. When in doubt, reflect on the company’s stated values.

Avoid Controversy When Using Twitter for HR

Actively avoid questionable activity on Twitter. Having a cautionary mindset means you should avoid engaging in anything political or religious (including following public figures, liking or retweeting polarizing posts, and posting anything controversial yourself). Keep Tweets strictly about your company to ensure you don’t alienate outstanding job candidates.

With the proliferation of technology today, HR professionals have a bounty of resources at their fingertips that can help them recruit and reach the best candidates for open positions. One of them is Twitter. By understanding how to use the platform and what pitfalls you can avoid, you can ensure that using Twitter for HR will help you do your job more effectively and efficiently and that you reach just the right audience.

Attract talented employees

Three Ways Predictive Analytics Is Disrupting HR

Today, predictive analytics is having an impact on nearly every field, including human resources. Predictive analytics has broken out of the pure-play tech sectors and now has real applications that can help transform businesses and productivity.

HR departments perform some of the most critical functions in an organization such as talent acquisition, performance and productivity mapping, and upskilling. The power of predictive analytics brings the facet of predictable, quantifiable outcomes to an area that has frequently relied upon human intuition.

Here are three key ways that predictive analytics is impacting human resources.

1. Talent Acquisition

Talented employees are a must for a successful organization. Yet, this is just a beginning. Businesses need experience, skills, and good corporate cultural fit. This last element is hard to quantify, but just as necessary as the other aspects.

Predictive analytics is having a positive influence on even conventional areas of talent acquisition such as background checks and outlining strategies. Advanced technology is enabling organizations to easily extract these crucial insights from the massive mountains of data now available.

2. Boosting Performance and Improving Productivity

Once you have acquired and onboarded the ideal employee, HR must ensure maximum performance for the company. Managers can now use analytics to hone in on key factors of performance, progress, errors, and successes. The aggregated data offers important, actionable insights.

In addition, when objective data is shared with employees, individual performance and productivity tend to improve, as ownership of the numbers increases. On the other side of that coin, it is much easier to address performance problems when objective factors are available.

3. Upskilling Your Workforce

Even government agencies are using the predictive analytics model for workforce strategy. This model enables managers to pinpoint gaps in skills, thereby giving HR more information about what skills to seek in new hires. Retention goes up and turnover goes down, while the team as a whole becomes stronger.

This type of strategy takes into account several factors depending on the organization, such as macro- and micro-economic variables which relate to the supply and demand for specific skills in an industry.

In addition, this strategizing is applicable to SMEs as well as enterprise-level organizations. The ability to identify gaps and fill them quickly to maintain optimum performance is a goal in any business.

Real-World Application of Predictive Analytics

Electronics and appliances retailer Best Buy uses HR predictive analytics to assess the impact of  employee engagement on store profitability. Best Buy’s HR team found that just a one-tenth of one percent increase in employee engagement results in an increase of over $100,000 in the store’s annual income. The results of that particular predictive analytics helped the Best Buy HR team decide to conduct four engagement surveys each year, rather than just one.

You might already be using predictive analytics without even realizing it. Do you review prospective candidates’ Facebook profiles prior to hiring? As far back as 2012, a study revealed that it is possible to predict someone’s personality and future work performance based data contained in their Facebook profile.

Of course, predictive analytics will never replace human intuition, but it can provide an objective, accurate, and quantitative foundation on which HR managers can base their predictions and forward-thinking decisions.

Corporate Collective Consciousness

Can you guess the movie from these famous quotes?

“Toto, I’ve got a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore.”

“May the Force be with you.”

“Here’s looking at you, kid.”

Chances are, you guessed all three. These quotes have become part of our collective consciousness. Nearly everybody recognizes them, even if they’ve never seen the original movie.

Does your company have a good corporate culture and collective consciousness, too? Everyone in your organization should share the same values, attitudes, and ideas. Everyone should be reading from the same page. But it doesn’t always work like this. What gives?

RELATED: Union Organizing Why Your Employer Brand Matters

Things Your Employees Inherently Know

There are things that every one of your employees inherently knows. They know what time they start work, what time they finish, where the vending machines are.

But do your employees know about your company mission and corporate culture? Your long-term strategic goals? Your morals, values, and beliefs?

Probably not. At least, most of them don’t. In fact, 61 percent of employees are completely unaware of their company’s mission statement. The majority of those who do (57 percent) say they feel uninspired by it.

The problem is, most employee orientation programs just aren’t good enough. They introduce employees to their new role but don’t focus on company culture and long-term development.

It’s no wonder, then, that most of your staff have no clue about your company’s values, ethics and corporate culture.

How to Improve Collective Consciousness

Want to improve your company’s collective consciousness? You need to engage with your employees, from their first interview to their final day in the office. Here’s how:

Make the Message Loud and Clear for Good Corporate Culture

If your employees are unaware of your mission statement, you probably aren’t communicating it clearly enough. List your goals and values on your website, on your social media pages, and in your employee orientation literature.

Be More Transparent

Business transparency is crucial for employee engagement. Your manager should be visible and friendly; your HR team should be approachable and willing to answer questions from your employees.

RELATED: Leading With Transparency and Empathy

Use the Latest Technology

The latest technology will help you communicate your message and improve collective consciousness. Employee orientation videos, for example, enhance the onboarding process, improve employee conduct and manage expectations. Your new hires are more likely to remember the information you’re telling them, too — 65 percent of people are visual learners.

Follow the tips on this list, and your company’s values, ethics, and goals will soon be as recognizable as all those famous movies quotes that everyone can roll off their tongue.

Discrimination Harassment Policies

Anti-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment Policies

Discrimination and harassment don’t just damage workplace morale and cause you to lose valuable personnel — they can also place your company at risk for ruinous lawsuits. The average court settlement for a discrimination or harassment lawsuit comes to about $125,000; harassment trials have resulted in awards of up to $168 million. If you want to protect both your workers and your business, the logical place to start is with strong, clear anti-discrimination and anti-harassment policies

What the Laws Say

It’s relatively easy to figure out what your anti-discrimination and anti-harassment policies need to convey by looking at the applicable laws. Workplaces throughout the U.S. are subject to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This law prohibits discrimination based on race, sex, religion, national origin, and color. Title VII also prohibits any kind of harassment based on these same characteristics, considering it a form of discrimination.
Federal law isn’t the only law you may need to consider. Your state may have its own particular laws prohibiting harassment based on marital status, gender identity, or other particulars not covered by title VII. Make sure you understand the laws for the state or states in which you do business.

Creating Your Anti-Discrimination Policies

While you can create separate anti-discrimination and anti-harassment policies, the overlap between these two terms means you can also write a single policy encompassing both behaviors. Start by clearly and unequivocally stating your company’s “zero tolerance” for discrimination and harassment.
Name as many protected characteristics as apply to you on the federal and state level. Since small but significant additions to these laws may occur at any time, and since it’s always possible to omit something by mistake, hedge your bets by adding a blanket statement covering any other protected characteristics currently included under the law.

Education and Enforcement

Don’t assume that your employees automatically understand which actions constitute discrimination or harassment. Spelling out specific examples in your written policies can help everyone understand exactly what’s acceptable and what isn’t. Give detailed instructions on how to report any instance of discrimination or harassment experienced or witnessed by the employee. Explain the disciplinary actions that management may take, up to and including termination, as well as the available options for employees accused of discrimination or harassment. Projections’ online harassment training can serve as an invaluable reinforcement to these efforts.
Last but not least, make sure your workers have agreed to uphold your policies. Include the policies in the employee handbook every new hire receives, and require each employee to sign a statement agreeing to conform to them. You’ll rest a lot easier once you’ve set the groundwork for a discrimination-free, harassment-free workplace!
new hire orientation

The One Thing Your New Hire Orientation Is Probably Missing

72 Hours To Inspire New Hire Engagement

After a new hire signs the appropriate forms for Human Resources, does your new hire process end – or do you have a new hire orientation program? Unfortunately, many companies mistake job training for onboarding. Companies offer top talent benefits and perks, interesting work and career opportunities during the recruitment process, and then it’s sink or swim from day one. Managers and Human Resource departments wonder why the people they so carefully selected never “fit in” and leave within a few years. The average employee tenure has decreased to 4.2 years per the U.S. Department of Labor.

So what is your new hire orientation missing? Likely, it’s a focus on creating immediate employee engagement. The importance of delivering a great onboarding experience is becoming more crucial as competition for top talent increases – and establishing your company as an employer of choice grows ever-more challenging.

Fitting In From Day One

New hire orientation has become a critical strategy for helping employees become productive as soon as possible. For a new employee, knowing that they are contributing to the company’s vision and mission has a positive effect on your company’s retention rates. Communicating your company’s larger purpose is a critical strategy for helping new employees assimilate into the company. Onboarding is an employee engagement, socialization and integration process as well as an orientation process. For this reason, many companies spend much of the first 72 hours of new employee onboarding helping the new hire understand the company’s culture and philosophy.

RELATED: HOW TO BUILD A UNION PROOF CULTURE FROM DAY ONE

A successful first 72 hours of onboarding will strengthen your corporate culture. New hires learn the mission of the company and the role they play in the company’s vision for a successful future. It’s a process that helps the new hire “fit in” from day one. The first hours of a new job today are busy ones – but in a different way than traditional orientation programs assumed. Much of the time involves leaders guiding new employees as they get comfortable in the workplace using a variety of communication tools, both online and off.

Four Best Practices for A  Spectacular First 72 Hours

Your organization needs a unique onboarding program to meet the needs of your unique culture and teams. The first 72 hours should be focused towards orienting the employee to the uniqueness of the organization, rather than sitting the person down with unfinished projects other employees may have left behind. Following are some best practices that make a new hire feel welcome, included and appreciated, while also providing critical information about the company and how it operates.

  1. Give the new hire a welcome message from the CEO or other top executives and managers. Give a tour and make introductions in person or via technology like video conferencing. LinkedIn has new recruits join other new hires for icebreakers with leaders sharing information about the company culture.
  2. Provide a company overview. Address topics like the organization’s mission, structure, benefits, and training and development opportunities. Much of this information is ideally delivered via robust new employee orientation videos and websites, designed to celebrate the new employee and welcome them while providing valuable information and often delivering the company’s union-free operating philosophy.
  3. Give the new hire an in-depth presentation on company core values. Zappos presents 10 core values to new hires and the history of those core values to create a bond. This presentation can also reinforce the company’s philosophy on unions because like Zappos, core values can include things like building a positive team and developing “honest relationships with communication” (transparency).
  4. Tell the story of the company, so the culture comes becomes tangible. Videos can present the organization’s history and successes, encouraging the employee to think, “I belong here and can contribute to future success.” At this point, the new hire should be feeling a bond with the company.

Don’t Stop There

Help the new hire begin writing their own company story by connecting them with other employees. Your effective, engagement-focused onboarding process should inspire new employees by sharing success stories of other team members via video. The new hire should feel excitement at the thought of making a unique contribution to organizational success and reinforcing the work culture. Videos of employees sharing inspiring work stories and of customers praising their relationship with the company are powerful engagement tools.

Want immediate engagement and loyalty? Before the new hire even arrives on the scene, make sure the tools they need are in place. Twitter has an onboarding process called “Yes-to-Desk”. When the Twitter new hire starts work, the computer, phone, access to systems and workspace already in place.

Assign your new hires a mentor or “buddy.” Assigning a go-to person who can give feedback and guide your most receptive minds is important. Google asks, doesn’t order, managers to consider assigning a peer buddy to each new hire. A mentor should not be the supervisor because the employee needs to feel comfortable asking questions and having work-related conversations. However, the mentor should also be someone who is highly engaged in your company’s culture and will help create greater engagement.

Discuss career development, expectations and opportunities to personalize the new hire orientation. In the first 72 hours, the information should set the tone and help the employee begin to solidify how he or she will fit in and contribute to the organization. The manager can begin engaging the new hire, in which conversations are held about performance targets.  A word of caution here: expecting an employee to “hit the ground running” is not fair to the new hire and can lead to missteps that haunt the person for a long time. Use this time to engage the new hire and get insight into their vision for their own future.

Institute ways to help new hires embrace company culture, no matter where the person is working. Today, many companies have remote workers, a situation that can make engagement that much more challenging. Mobile enabled onboarding and learning enables remote workers, as well as in-house employees, access to the onboarding program 24-7. L’Oréal’s Fit Culture App is a customized mobile app developed in-house that helps employees understand and live the company culture. It includes texts, videos, employee testimonials, games, real-life missions and the company story.  Most companies can utilize custom videos, web, and eLearning solutions. It’s more cost efficient and employers get access to expertise they may not have in-house.

RELATED: CREATE ENGAGED EMPLOYEES WITH 3 THREE EASY TIPS

New hire orientation should also help the new hire feel comfortable with the company’s technology – a source of immediate collaboration and engagement. Pinterest uses the first few days to promote collaboration. On day one, new hires meet for breakfast in the San Francisco headquarters. After breakfast, they learn “knitting” which is the company’s word for collaboration and seeing the world from different points of view. On the second day, the new hires learn about the Pinterest brand and how feedback is gathered from pinners. At the end of the second day, the person starts work and begins using the internal collaboration technology #Slack.

Be sure to establish metrics that let the organization know whether the onboarding program is effective. Metrics can be quantitative and qualitative. They include measuring the new hire’s engagement level, times the person accessed self-service learning opportunities, turnover, employee satisfaction with onboarding process and performance over a period of time. Google measures results with real data from onboarding initiatives and gets feedback on what the person would change.

At the End of the Day

In order to overcome the missing element of engagement, your onboarding process needs structure. In the “old days” people started their new jobs with little guidance, and much of that guidance was geared at job-specific training.

The first few days of your new hire orientation should be a mix of interactive learning and face-to-face socialization with coworkers, supervisors and managers. When is a person fully assimilated? Michael Watkins, author of The First 90 Days says it depends on the job. High level employees transitioning within the company may take six months, but if coming from the outside, it may be a year. An effective onboarding program can shorten that time considerably. True engagement happens when the new hire truly believe they are a contributing part of the team and drive the desired culture.

There are many onboarding software programs available today. Self-service new hire portals can give employees access to HR forms, policies and procedures, company philosophies on things like unions and customer service, video messages from executives, explanations of benefits, online tours, virtual teams, communication systems, and more. Custom videos, web and eLearning solutions can begin and continue the new hire’s assimilation process.

Successful leaders understand that employee engagement begins on day one but continues as long as the person is working for the company. After the first 72 hours, the real work of socialization accelerates. Some companies like AdTheorent have executive breakfasts within a short time period with new employees to talk about the company’s vision in a relaxed setting. Over the early months, new hires spend time with team members and attend lunches, dinners and team cocktail events. In the final analysis, the key takeaway is that new hire orientation for an  employee in the first 72 hours can bring long-term positive results for the organization.

Grab your free New Hire Orientation Checklist here.

Ready to talk about developing your new hire strategy? Combine Projections’ video, web and eLearning solutions to create a robust and engaging program. Let’s chat now about your company’s unique plan for new hire engagement! 

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